Helping Veterans Overcome PTSD, Trauma In Their Post-Military Life

Feb 20, 2017

Monday, February, 20, 2017

Credit Fort Rucker / Flickr

North Carolina is home to nearly 800,000 veterans, some of whom have trouble reintegrating into life after combat.  A Charlotte veteran talks with Mike Collins about how PTSD factored into his post-military transition, and we hear from a UNC Charlotte expert on the needs and challenges facing these veterans.

The needs of veterans is of particular importance to North Carolina, home to nearly 800,000 veterans and the most populous U.S. military installation – Fort Bragg. The ranks of veterans grows as America’s longest-running war – the fight in Afghanistan – continues.

The return home for veterans can be tricky, transitioning from active duty into civilian life. It can be even more difficult if that veteran returns with a traumatic injury, such as the loss of a limb or PTSD. Studies have shown as many as 20 percent of veterans of the Iraq and Afghan wars suffer from PTSD. A similar percentage are dealing with traumatic brain injury.

The reintegration of these veterans into post-combat life is the focus of an upcoming conference at UNC Charlotte. We’ll talk with a veteran about their re-entry into civilian life. We also hear from a veteran reintegration researcher and speak with North Carolina’s Department of Military and Veterans Affairs about the steps the state is taking to help with the transition.

GUESTS

Dr. Christine Elnitsky, director, UNC Charlotte Academy for Veteran and Military Health; associate professor of nursing

James Prosser, assistant secretary for veterans affairs, North Carolina Department of Military and Veterans Affairs

Jerry Dahlberg, retired, Sgt. 1st Class, US Army; pursuing Ph.D. in engineering at UNC Charlotte.

EVENT

UNC Charlotte Veterans Health Conference, Feb. 28, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Details: http://nursing.uncc.edu/unc-charlotte-veterans-health-conference-address-reintegration-civilian-roles

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