Ask Me Another
11:51 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Hahd-Cawr Pun

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:07 am

We kick off our road show with a game dedicated to the stereotypical Boston dialect--you know, the one that tells you to "Pahk your cah in Hahvahd Yahd"? Host Ophira Eisenberg has a little punny fun with phrases and names that take on whole new meanings when you drop the "r's" in certain words. And for the record, "Hahd-Cawr Pun" is just Boston-speak for "Hard-Core Pun."

Plus, house musician Jonathan Coulton leads the crowd in a rousing rendition of a hometown favorite: Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline," a tune often heard during the seventh-inning stretch at Red Sox home games. So for the love of baseball, sing along.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

We have our first two fabulous contestants right here. We have Claire Natola and Jack Martin. Welcome.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Claire, you're originally from Boston. Do you have a Boston accent?

CLAIRE NATOLA: It will come out the longer I'm around everybody here tonight.

EISENBERG: Other Bostonians.

NATOLA: Yeah. When I speak to relatives on the phone, it comes right back.

EISENBERG: It's right out there. Okay, back with your family. And Jack, you live in Medford?

JACK MARTIN: I live in Medford, born in Brighton, native Bostonian. It may not sound like it.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Interesting you say that, because that little questionnaire was our genius segue into our first game, which is called Hahd-Cawr Pun. That's hard-core pun, for anyone who doesn't understand the stereotypical Boston accent, which is, of course, when you do not pronounce the R's.

So, what we're going to do is quiz you on common phrases and names that have a different meaning when you don't pronounce the R's. For example, if we said it's cacao products on a waterfront pier, you would say dock chocolate, instead of dark chocolate.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And the winner of this round will move on to our Ask Me One More final round at the end of the show. Let's play. It's what you send a white-fleshed fish celebrating another year of life.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jack?

MARTIN: Birthday cod.

EISENBERG: That's right, correct, well done.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's the 1980s hit song from Culture Club, about a reptile that can change its appearance to resemble a punctuation mark.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jack?

MARTIN: That would be comma chameleon.

EISENBERG: There you go. You come and go in between words. It's a scary film about circle dancing at Jewish weddings.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jack?

MARTIN: How about the Amityville hora?

EISENBERG: The Amityville hora. We were looking for hora movie, so that will do.

MARTIN: Oh, okay. Okay.

EISENBERG: William Shakespeare's famous six-pack abs earned him this nickname around Stratford.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire?

NATOLA: The bod of Avon.

EISENBERG: The bod of Avon. Claire, you are correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It was the midnight show at the Globe Theater.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: She's a professional who schedules toddlers' bathroom visits.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire?

NATOLA: Potty planner.

EISENBERG: You got it, potty planner.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

NATOLA: I finally figured out how to use the buzza.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: If you're stuck in a dead-end job, moving from Seoul to Pyongyang might be a much-needed type of this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jack?

MARTIN: Korea change.

EISENBERG: Korea change is correct.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: He was one of the biggest country music singers of the 1990s, with "Friends in Low Places," but now he's wearing all black clothes and dark eyeliner.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire?

NATOLA: Goth Brooks.

EISENBERG: Goth Brooks.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That was a very close game but in this case, Jack, you are moving on to our final round at the end of the show. Congratulations.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Claire, an excellent contender. Jonathan, do you have something that you can play for us on your guitah?

JONATHAN COULTON: I understand this is the song that is sung during the seventh inning stretch at Fenway. So let's do this and stretch, because I know we're all exhausted from the trivia. This is called "Sweet Caroline."

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

COULTON: Where it began, I can't begin to know it, but then I know it's growing strong. It was in the spring. Spring became the summer. Who'd have believed you'd come along. Hands, touching hand, reaching out, touching me, touching you. Sweet Caroline.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIENCE SINGING AND CLAPPING)

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

COULTON: Good times never seemed so good.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIENCE SINGING)

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

COULTON: I've been inclined.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIENCE SINGING)

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

COULTON: To believe they never would.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Hi, Boston.

EISENBERG: Thank you, Jonathan Coulton. So weird how no one ever knows the words to that song.

COULTON: Yeah. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.