Charlotte Talks: Chronicling Charlotte Homicides / North End Redevelopment With Some History

Jul 10, 2017

Photos of some of Charlotte's 2017 homicide victims.
Credit WFAE

Monday, July 10, 2017

We get a fuller picture of Charlotte’s homicide rate and how it has affected the city. Then, our Block-By-Block series takes us to Camp North End. This languishing area is about to get a facelift.

Part One: WFAE's Sarah Delia Chronicles Charlotte's Homicides

By now you know that homicide in Charlotte is on the rise - there have been 49 murders so far this year. It's a problem that's been well-documented by media reports. But the story is much deeper than names or a number.

WFAE reporter Sarah Delia has been documenting the stories of some of those killed. She's been on patrol with police officers and talked with people close to some of the victims to get a fuller picture of the problem and how it's affecting the community.

In advance of a WFAE Public Conversation on Charlotte's homicide problem, Mike Collins talks with Delia about her reporting.

Guest

Sarah Delia - Reporter for WFAE

Want to attend WFAE's Public Conversation about homicide in Charlotte? It's Tuesday night, July 11, 7:00-8:30 p.m. at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church. Details and free registration here.

Part Two: Block by Block: Charlotte's Camp North End

Booming development continues to roll outside of the bounds of uptown, with redevelopment scooping up available land near the desirable city center. Areas to the north of town are seeing big changes in what's been dubbed Charlotte's North End.

One of those projects is drawing a lot of attention. Camp North End is slated to bring offices, restaurants, entertainment options and housing to a 75-acre industrial site on Statesville Avenue. The site includes old buildings and warehouses, some with history.

The old Hercules Industrial Park off Statesville Avenue is up for redevelopment as part of the 'Camp North End' project.
Credit David Boraks / WFAE

One of them dates back to 1924, and was home to a former Ford Model T factory, later served as an induction center for the Army during WWII, and made missiles for the government during the Cold War. The developers want to repurpose some of the buildings and preserve the area's history, which is welcome news to some in a city known for tearing down historic buildings.

The area is getting a lot of buzz for this possible reinvestment, but it has some neighborhood residents concerned about the redevelopment gentrifying the area. We take a closer look at Camp North End in the next installment of WFAE’s Block by Block series.

Guests

Damon Hemmerdinger - co-president of ATCO Properties & Management, a real estate group based in New York. They are developing the Camp North End project

Varian Shrum - community manager at Camp North End

Terry Shook - an architect and planner. Founding partner and principal of Shook Kelley, a design firm. He’s been involved with redevelopment projects in Charlotte’s North End.