Tommy Tomlinson

Host of SouthBound

Credit JEFF CRAVOTTA

Tommy Tomlinson has written for publications including Esquire, ESPN the Magazine, Sports Illustrated, Forbes, Garden & Gun, and many others. He spent 23 years as a reporter and local columnist for the Charlotte Observer, where he was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize in commentary. His stories have been chosen twice for the “Best American Sports Writing” series (2012 and 2015) and he also appears in the anthology “America’s Best Newspaper Writing.”

He teaches magazine writing at Wake Forest University and has also taught at the University of Georgia, Queens University of Charlotte and the Poynter Institute. He has been a speaker at workshops and conferences across the country.

His book “The Elephant In the Room,” a memoir about life as an overweight man in a growing America, will be published soon by Simon & Schuster.

He’s a graduate of the University of Georgia and was a 2008-09 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

Tommy and his wife, Alix Felsing, live in Charlotte.

SouthBound Podcast Archives on WFAE

New episodes of SouthBound will be published every other week on Wednesday.

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Courtesy of the Artist

In connection with the latest SouthBound episode -- an interview with Josh Burford, Southern LGBTQ historian -- we present a collection of music from LGBTQ artists from the South. 

I had a lot of fun -- and learned a lot -- making this one. For a deep historical dive on LGBTQ music of all kinds, make sure to check out JD Doyle's work at http://www.queermusicheritage.com.

Courtesy of Kathleen Purvis

Kathleen Purvis has spent the last 30 years eating, sipping, thinking about and writing about Southern food and drink. She has been the food writer at the Charlotte Observer since 1989 and has won a slew of regional and national awards for her stories. She has written three books – her latest book, “Distilling the South: A Guide to Southern Craft Liquors,” will be published in May by UNC Press.

Courtesy of Kathleen Purvis

When it comes to writing about Southern food, women have traditionally dominated. But there’s been a shift – so much so that it had turned into a men’s club, argues author and Charlotte Observer food writer Kathleen Purvis. She wrote about it in a piece last year for The Bitter Southerner – and talks about it on the latest episode of the WFAE podcast, SouthBound. Here’s a preview of her conversation with host Tommy Tomlinson.

Courtesy of Dolph Ramseur

On this episode of SouthBound we talk with Dolph Ramseur, who grew up on a dirt road in Concord, North Carolina, trying to keep from having to work in the cotton mills that used to employ so many southerners, including many in his own family.

Courtesy of the Artist

Last week's guest on SouthBound, John T. Edge, went to the University of Georgia in the early '80s. So did I. Here's some music that was floating around Athens back then -- from local bands and from around the South.

Jason Thrasher

On this episode of SouthBound we talk to John T. Edge, who has thought more, and more deeply, about Southern food than maybe anyone else in the world. 

What lessons can we learn about the South’s history through traditional Southern dishes? That’s a question that John T. Edge has set out to examine in his new book, The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South.

Edge is a food writer and historian who heads the Southern Foodways Alliance. He’s the guest on the newest episode of WFAE’s new podcast, Southbound.

Harvey Gantt stands on the steps of Sikes Hall on the day he entered Clemson University, Jan. 28, 1963.
clemsonunivlibrary / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

On this episode of SouthBound we talk to Harvey Gantt, who has spent his whole life pushing against the boundaries of the South.