Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways to Connect

Michael Tomsic / WFAE-FM

Those seeking political office had until noon today to file for this year’s election. Two races in particular are fielding a large number of candidates.  


Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Later this year North Carolina voters will have a chance to do something rare – elect four of the seven justices on the State Supreme Court.  There will likely be record amounts of money poured into those races.  So much so that some are worried that justice may seem for sale.


In earlier versions of this story we mistakenly referred to Medicare expansion.  It should have been Medicaid expansion.

On Monday, lawmakers in Raleigh were given an assessment of the state’s ability to treat those with mental illness and those seeking treatment for addiction.  And that assessment was not good. 

Courtesty of Joe Vincoli.

North Carolina employees in the private-sector have greater whistleblower protection thanks in large part to man named Joe Vincoli.

Two years ago, his story spurred lawmakers to expand protections beyond state employees. 

But Vincoli, who has helped save tens of millions of taxpayer dollars, was recently fired – without cause.  This time by the state. 

All documents referred to in this piece can be found here.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utilities

It’s been nearly a week since someone illegally pumped more than a thousand gallons of PCB’s, a toxic chemical,  into the Charlotte sewer system.  WFAE’s Tom Bullock reports on where the criminal investigation stands and the cleanup the city is facing.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utilities

Charlotte police are trying to identify who pumped toxic chemicals into a city sewer line.  The incident caused authorities to shut down the Mallard Creek water treatment plant for some 17 hours.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

This week's edition of WFAE Talks has a newby. He's Money & Influence reporter Tom Bullock. Tom sat in for Ben Bradford, who was getting some sleep after a long and busy day of covering the Duke Energy coal ash spill on the Dan River. Tom, Lisa and Greg discuss the spill, the problems and  uncertainty over implementation of North Carolina's third-grade reading law, and high stakes in this year's state Supreme Court election.


A federal judge has ruled the North Carolina Department of Transportation illegally seized and destroyed private property in Concord. The judge ordered the agency to pay more than $20,000 in fines. 


gbein83/Flickr

Charlotte already hosts a number of major sporting events each year.  There are the NASCAR races – of course, and Panthers and Bobcat games.  But later this summer the city may briefly be home to two of the best professional soccer teams in the world. 

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