Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways to Connect

Tom Bullock steps in for Ben Bradford on this week's show. Greg, Lisa and Tom discuss the race for Charlotte mayor and Patrick Cannon's recognition on the The Daily Show. Plus, the production assist that some candidates are giving third-party interest groups, and a charter school in Charlotte that shuts down before the school year ends.

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Many of the political ads you see and hear are produced by independent third-party interest groups. They are called “independent” because it’s illegal for these groups and candidates to coordinate their campaigns.

But this year it’s harder to distinguish between these groups and some candidates in North Carolina’s U.S. Senate Race.

This year the campaigns of Thom Tillis and Kay Hagan are pushing the boundaries of election law.


Tonight, Charlotte City Council may have an answer to this question – who is the next mayor of Charlotte?

But no matter what happens at tonight's meeting, Council will undoubtedly try to reassure the public the city is moving on from former mayor Patrick Cannon.


How The FBI's Case Against Cannon Went Down

Mar 27, 2014
Michael Tomsic

On Wednesday morning, Patrick Cannon was Mayor of Charlotte and a rising political figure in the state. Less than 24 hours later he’s out on bond, no longer in government, and facing a host of federal charges. The story of his fall is one of undercover cops, multi-million dollar investments, bugged apartments, and feminine hygiene products. WFAE’s Ben Bradford and Tom Bullock bring us this report.


James Willamor

A request for $51 million of city money to rehab the Bojangles Coliseum was a bit surprising. The city has already approved $25 million to renovate the site. This new proposal is still just that, a proposal. But it left us wondering just what this additional money would be used for.  So we turned to a real person and a talking document to find out.    


Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Charlotte is considering nearly $300 million of new spending on projects for the next fiscal year. City council members met Wednesday night to hear the proposals. 

Capital projects are physical things like runways, city parks and desk chairs. Charlotte currently has $25 million of available funding for such projects, basically wiggle room for the 2015 budget. 

Which means in order to pay for some or all of these requests, the city would likely have to raise taxes or fees or take on debt.   

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

In seven weeks, North Carolinians will go to the polls for the state  primary elections.  This means candidates for all kinds of offices are out wooing voters and raising money. For those trying to become elected judges - the process is a bit strange.  And even the candidates worry it may hurt the credibility of the state’s highest courts. 


RST Fiber

Google is still considering if it will bringing its ultra-high speed internet to cities like Charlotte. But if you don’t want to wait, you may not have to. This week, a small North Carolina Company announced it has already built a similar fiber optic network across the entire state. The company is called RST Fiber and we take a look at what they offer and one of the men behind it.


New leadership and a surprise merger of sorts. No we’re not talking about the latest on Chiquita banana.  In this installment of our Thursday political conversation Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt and WFAE's Tom Bullock talk about a week of good and bad news for the North Carolina Democratic Party. 


Google

The city of Charlotte was recently given a bit of homework. How the city answers a series of questions will determine if neighborhoods like South Park, Uptown and Dilworth will be Google’s next fiber-hoods. So what could Google Fiber in Charlotte mean for consumers and businesses alike?  

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