Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways To Connect

Marshall Terry / WFAE

A bill which would protect confederate monuments in North Carolina has been approved by a House committee and will go before the full chamber early next week.

Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

The State Board of Elections has ruled no laws were broken when an Oklahoma man with ties to illegal gambling gave $270,000 to the campaigns of leading North Carolina politicians.


Tom Bullock / WFAE News

It took less than five minutes to remove the Confederate flag from the South Carolina capitol, a symbol that’s been fought over for 54 years. It happened on the same day the FBI admitted the alleged shooter in the Charleston church killings should not have been permitted to buy a gun.


Tom Bullock / WFAE

The Confederate flag no longer flies on the grounds of the South Carolina statehouse. A state Highway Patrol honor guard lowered the flag Friday morning in a ceremony that drew a large crowd and political leaders, but no speeches.

Gov. Nikki Haley had promised the flag would be taken down “with dignity,” but up until it actually happened Friday morning it wasn’t clear what that would entail.    

scscv.com

The Confederate battle flag will soon be removed from the grounds of South Carolina’s state capitol. Shortly after 1 a.m., the state House gave its final approval to take down the flag and move it to a nearby museum. The vote was 94-20 and came after a long and contentious night.

Seven hours into the debate, Representative Joseph Neal reminded his colleagues that “when that flag stands out front, the entire African-American Community feels a pain.”

A pain, the Democrat said, based on a long and disturbing history and the recent murder of nine black parishioners. 

South Carolina House debate began late Wednesday on legislation that would remove the Confederate flag from the Capitol grounds. First, lawmakers rejected a series of compromise amendments. WFAE's Tom Bullock has this update with NPR's Kelly McEvers during All Things Considered:


Tom Bullock/WFAE News

A conservative group has launched a campaign to pressure South Carolina legislators to leave the Confederate flag in front of the State Capital.

The group, called the Conservative Response Team, has no official website, but has a presence on Facebook and Youtube. They claim to be a 501(c)4 group (status pending) and say they are “ready to fight back anywhere, anytime against leftist kooks.”

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

South Carolina lawmakers reconvene in Columbia this morning, where they will debate the fate of a Confederate flag flying on the grounds of the capital. Lawmakers have introduced three bills to move the flag to a nearby museum. But for many, this debate is about more than just location.

City of Greensboro

On Monday, the North Carolina House overwhelmingly voted against a bill to redistrict the Greensboro City Council. Yet House members found themselves voting on the measure again Thursday, twice.

If at first you don’t succeed, take it up with a conference committee. House and Senate negotiators hastily arranged the meeting to make changes both chambers could, in theory, agree upon.

NC General Assembly

Protest petitions are a major way citizens can object to zoning changes in their neighborhoods. The North Carolina Senate has tentatively approved a measure to effectively kill that tool.

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