Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways to Connect

Flickr/Vox Efx

We know the big news. Republican Donald Trump has been elected the 45th President of the United States of America. We also know that he will work with a GOP controlled US House and Senate.

But what do we know about state races and the roll North Carolina played in electing Trump the 45th President of the United States?

Tom Bullock / WFAE

It all comes down to this. After months (and months, and months) of debates, ads, political claims and counter claims, voters go to the polls and cast ballots in the 2016 general election.

So far so good here in Mecklenburg County with no major issues to report. There were reports of long lines at some voting sites this morning.

Charlotte Talks Host Mike Collins spoke with Michael Dickerson, the Director of Elections for Mecklenburg County this morning:


Denise Cross Photography

Election Day is tomorrow and this much we know, baring a surprise of historic proportions the next president of the United States will speak in North Carolina on Monday. Both Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump have scheduled last minute stops in what has become the front line of this election. 

vote here sign
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

Who is voting may be just as scrutinized on Election Day as who wins. And we’re not talking about classic voting blocks.

From the mundane like ballot selfies, to the serious, like claims of rigged elections, fraud or voter intimidation, much of the scrutiny has been fueled on social media.

This is a national narrative. But like many things this election North Carolina finds itself at the center of the story.

Candidate websites

The North Carolina treasurer’s race often gets overshadowed by other elections. But consider this, the treasurer runs a pension and health care system for state employees that is roughly four times the size of the state’s yearly budget.

WFAE’s Tom Bullock and Morning Edition host Marshall Terry break down the race for North Carolina treasurer.

Republican U.S. Senator Richard Burr
Burr's Google Plus Account

It seems October surprises aren’t just for presidential candidates.

Monday night, an audio recording came to light showing North Carolina Senator Richard Burr making comments that can be characterized as controversial at best.

Screen Grab via YouTube

No matter your preferred genre, be it rock, rap, country, pop, whatever, every live show follows a simple plan; the big draw goes last. 

That’s one thing that made Thursday’s campaign stop in Winston-Salem by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and First Lady Michelle Obama interesting. Ok, one of many.

Yes, it was the first time the two women took the stage at a campaign event this year. And yes, it comes at a key time in a battleground state.

Politicians love to brag about their endorsements. Those statements of support from other candidates, police or labor unions, newspapers, whatever.

On Friday, October 28th, Republican Governor Pat McCrory received an endorsement from a newspaper which, at first blush, sounds great for him. The endorsement starts with this question, “Which candidate would do the most to help our local economy?”

Twitter

Economies of scale is a term well known in the business world. It means a way of saving money if you buy in bulk or better use what you already have.

It’s also a factor in politics.

And may be behind all the attention given two campaign messages sent out by conservatives this week about HB 2.

Center For Public Integrity

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by poring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.

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