Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways to Connect

US Navy

Sometimes, just sometimes, extreme persistence pays off. Especially when you're trying to help Panthers fans spread hither and yon cheer on their team from afar. 

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Later this month the Charlotte City Council is expected to do something it failed to do last year, expand the city’s non-discrimination ordinance to include protections for LGBT individuals. It was a contentious issue then, and remains one today. So, Monday night, the city tried something different. Something that relied on dialogue between those in the audience and dialogue from actors on stage.

Lumberton Chamber of Commerce

We now bring you a story of possible election fraud in North Carolina. The setting, the city of Lumberton, south of Fayetteville. The scheme? Allegedly buying votes. The currency? Well, investigators aren’t saying but it may have something to do with breakfast.

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

There will be no meeting of the Charlotte City Council tonight. But the city will host a meeting about one of the most contentious issues in Charlotte, expanding the local non-discrimination ordinance to include protections for LGBT individuals. Last March, the Charlotte City Council voted down this expansion after a contentious meeting. There were protesters outside, and passionate speakers inside (you can find our coverage of the meeting here.)

WFAE

Common sense tells you that our politics are polarized. In fact, so does the use of "common sense." Reporter Tom Bullock discusses a story he produced on the topic that's both entertaining and informative.

Reporter Michael Tomsic spent time in Winston-Salem this week covering the voter ID trial. He'll discuss how arguments inside the courtroom are different than the public relations spin by groups on both sides of the debate.

Twitter / NHPR

Iowa and New Hampshire. Two states that don’t normally get a lot of attention. But right now you’d have to be holed up on an uncharted desert isle to avoid hearing about them, ad nauseam, in the news.

If you watch Thursday night’s Republican presidential debate, there’s a phrase we can all but guarantee you’ll hear. It’s two words and its used by politicians from every party.

Have you figured out what that phrase is yet?

South Carolina Government

It’s become a well-known trope - a politician attacks the press for being biased, unaccountable, liberal. Now a Republican lawmaker in South Carolina wants to take it a bit further, he’s introduced legislation that would force journalists to register with the state or be subject to fines and jail time.

www.house.gov

Update: A vote to move the refugee legislation to the U.S. Senate floor fell five votes short of the 60 necessary.

On Wednesday,  a U.S. Senate committee will take up a bill which would make it much more difficult for Syrian and Iraqi refugees to be re-settled in America. The legislation, known as American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act, was proposed by 8th District Congressman Richard Hudson, a Republican whose district stretches from east Charlotte to Lumberton. WFAE’s Tom Bullock recently spoke with the congressman about his bill.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

A bit of history was made Monday in Columbia, SC. For the first time, marchers with the annual Martin Luther King Day at the Dome march were not greeted by the Confederate battle flag when they reached the state capitol. But this march was not about mission accomplished. And it didn’t keep the leading Democrats running for president from using the Martin Luther King Day gathering to woo voters.

Pages