Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

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Local News
4:23 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Film Incentives Likely Cut; Will Industry Walk Away From State?

CBS's "Under The Dome" is just one of the TV shows filmed in North Carolina that are assessing whether to remain in the state.
Credit Courtesy of EUE/Screen Gems

It’s been more than 24 hours since Speaker Thom Tillis and Senator Pro Tem Phil Berger announced a budget deal was all but done.

Senator Berger said the document would be printed – and published online for all to see late Tuesday night or sometime today.

That still hasn’t happened. Which means there are scant details on just how the General Assembly will pay for the teacher raises and other new spending they announced yesterday afternoon.

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Local News
12:30 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Future Of County Sales Tax Bill Looks Bleak

Credit 401(K) 2013 / Flickr

The future of a bill to cap county sales tax at 2.5 percent is bleak. This after the House Finance Committee took up the measure earlier this morning.

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Local News
4:17 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Lawmakers Announce NC Budget; Give Few Details On How They'll Pay For It

Credit NC General Assembly

Tom Bullock's updated report for Morning Edition.

Updated 10 a.m.

The details of North Carolina’s new $21 billion budget will be made public.

The document will hopefully answer many of the questions left on the table after House Speaker Thom Tillis and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger officially announced yesterday a deal had been struck.

But the publishing of the document also starts a 48-hour countdown clock. After that period the House can vote on the new budget. And some democratic leaders in the house warn that isn’t enough time to figure out if the new budget makes fiscal senses for the state.

Listen here to Tom Bullock's report that aired Tuesday on All Things Considered.

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Local News
2:57 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

How Much Will Icahn Pocket In Family Dollar Sale? (Hint: A lot)

Activist Investor Carl Icahn
Credit Courtesy of Carl Icahn's Twitter page

How much is it worth to get your way? Sure, bragging rights and a sense of satisfaction may be priceless, but few would turn down the check billionaire investor Carl Icahn is set to get now that Dollar Tree intends to purchase Family Dollar for $8.5 billion.

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Local News
4:10 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Cut To State Income Tax Costing Far More Than Expected

Chart showing the updated cost to North Carolina due to last year's income tax rate change.
Credit Fiscal Research Division

Last year’s cut of the personal income tax rate is costing North Carolina far more than originally projected.  This according to new figures released by the General Assembly’s Fiscal Research Division.

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Arts & Life
3:30 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Medal Of Honor Recipient Who Called Fayetteville Home Now Honored With Stamp

Rudy Hernandez, U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipient, at a 2009 NASA event in Langley, Virginia.
Credit NASA/Sean Smith

Nearly seven million people donned American military uniforms to fight in the Korean War.

Of those, just 145 received the highest military commendation this country can bestow…the Medal of Honor.

Saturday, at Arlington National Cemetery, the United States Postal Service, will issue a new set of stamps immortalizing a few of those Medal of Honor recipients, the 13 still alive when the series was commissioned. One of them was a man who called Fayetteville home. 

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Local News
12:20 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Sales Tax Cap Debate Proves Contentious But Passes NC Senate

Credit 401(K) 2013 / Flickr

On Wednesday, the North Carolina Senate passed a bill capping county sales tax rates at 2.5 percent.

The vote was 33 to 16.   

The final tally came after more than an hour of contentious debate.

North Carolina’s urban vs. rural divide was front and center throughout the debate.  

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Politics
3:37 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Sales Tax Cap Passes Key Senate Vote

Credit NC General Assembly

After a contentious debate on the Senate floor earlier today, a bill capping county sales tax passed 33 to 16. Joining Mark Rumsey to talk about the bill and the implications for Mecklenburg County is WFAE’s Tom Bullock.


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Politics
9:46 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Are Safe Political Seats Behind The Budget Impasse?

North Carolina counties by party representation in state Senate.

Imagine the nasty notes you’d receive if you were four weeks late on your rent or mortgage.

If a pregnancy went four weeks long doctors would induce labor.

But if you’re a lawmaker, or a whole group of them in Raleigh, and your budget is four weeks late as of today, well…

So what is taking the pressure off lawmakers to get a budget deal done?

Unless you’ve spent your summer on a desert island with a volleyball named Wilson you know the issues holding up the budget are teacher pay, teaching assistants and Medicaid payments.

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Local News
9:35 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Senate Changes County Sales Tax Bill; Still Kills Meck County Vote

On Monday night the Senate Finance Committee debated county sales taxes again.

That bill was changed but not in a way that would keep a planned Mecklenburg county vote alive.

Generally, if you buy something in Mecklenburg county, you currently pay 7.25 percent in sales tax. The majority of that tax goes to the state, but 2.5 percent goes to the county.

The original senate proposal capped the sales tax rate every county could charge at 2.5 percent. That original senate plan passed the finance committee unanimously last Wednesday.

So what was the big change?  It comes down to two words: either, or.

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