Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Ways to Connect

Over the past year, the CMPD and data researchers with the University of Chicago have taken part in an ambitious experiment. Can an algorithm help stop police misconduct before the incident takes place?

In part 1 of our series, we reported on the differences between the algorithm, known as random forest, and the current Early Intervention System used by the CMPD.

In part 2, we look at the results of this experiment.

Screen Grab of Pat McCrory campaign ad

Governor Pat McCrory’s reelection campaign is out with a provocative new ad.

It’s a testimonial, featuring a survivor of sexual assault speaking in favor of House Bill 2.

But the ad may give the wrong impression of the circumstances surrounding her assault.

It’s not the content but the context of the ad that raises questions.

Police misconduct comes in many forms. From a rude interaction with civilians to a fatal, unjustified shooting. At worst these acts are criminal. At best they erode public trust and make it harder for good cops to do their jobs.

But what if there was a computer program that could identify problem officers BEFORE an incident takes place? What if that same program could even identify what makes an otherwise good officer go bad and allow the police department to predict and prevent misconduct?

Tom Bullock / WFAE

If Donald Trump’s campaign were a restaurant, there’d be a sign out front reading "Under New Management."

Earlier this week the Republican presidential nominee  brought in two new people to run his campaign. And last night in Charlotte came the first Trump speech since the management shake-up.

So has anything changed?

North Carolina Department of Heath and Human Services

You normally don’t hear much about North Carolina’s state epidemiologist.

But it’s not every day that a scientist sends out a scathing letter of resignation.

That’s just what Dr. Megan Davies did late Tuesday night, citing what she sees as McCory administration officials misleading the public about whether or not well water near unlined coal ash ponds is safe to drink. 

via Twitter

Donald Trump has a reputation for suing his critics. Now a former member of his North Carolina staff is suing the Republican nominee’s presidential campaign and its former state director for assault, battery, negligence and emotional distress. 

NRA Political Victory Fund

Just hours after Donald Trump’s controversial gun comments in Wilmington on Tuesday, the National Rifle Association announced they were spending $3 million on ads attacking Hillary Clinton in battleground states including North Carolina.

Screen Grab via WRAL

Some will see it as a joke, others as a call to violence against his main opponent. Either way Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump made a comment at a rally in Wilmington Tuesday that is sure to be controversial.

Lapel pins and Twitter. Both can be quick ways to express political opinions. But, as the North Carolina Republican party learned Wednesday night, it’s best to understand one before taking to the other.

Donald Trump addressing VFW National Convention
David T. Foster III / Charlotte Observer

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump laid out his plan to fix the country’s VA health care system. He was speaking Tuesday at the VFW convention in uptown Charlotte. Besides the plan, Trump also attacked Democratic rival Hilary Clinton, and some in the crowd joined in.

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