Sarah Delia

Arts Reporter

At this point in her life, Sarah considers home to be a state of mind—not one place. Before joining the WFAE news team, she was hosting and reporting in the deep south in Birmingham, Alabama. In past lives she was a northerner having worked and lived in Indiana, Maine, and New York City. She grew up in Virginia and attended James Madison University in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

Sarah got her start in radio at WXJM, her college radio station where she hosted a talk show, a music program, and helped manage the student run station. It’s also where she made lifelong friends and discovered a love for talking into microphones.

Sarah has interned and worked at NPR in Washington DC, interned and freelanced for WNYC, and attended the Salt Institute for Radio Documentary Studies.

She enjoys telling stories that are off the beaten path and she’s excited to dive into the arts and culture scene in Charlotte. In her spare time Sarah loves to paint, collect vintage birdcages, pick through old vinyl, spend time with her pets, and turn claw foot bathtubs into couches. 

Ways to Connect

Sarah Delia

The Arts and Science Council requested $2.3 million from the Mecklenburg County Commission. The money would fund arts and science education programs. But some commissioners were not impressed with how the request was made. WFAE's Sarah Delia reports.


Erik Hageness

Garrison Keillor is an American story teller, humorist, and the host of A Prairie Home Companion which has graced public radio airwaves since the 1970’s. He brings his one man show to the Belk Theater at the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center this Sunday.

He spoke with WFAE’s Sarah Delia about his career in radio and upcoming performance.

 


Photo by Russ Harrington.

Grammy Award winning singer song-writer, Mary Chapin Carpenter is coming to Charlotte. Carpenter’s impressive career includes an induction to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. She’s also been named the Country Music Association female Vocalist of the Year not once, but three times. This Saturday, she pairs up with the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra to perform old favorites in a different way.

She spoke to WFAE’s Sarah Delia about the upcoming performance and album that inspired it. 


Courtesy of Lawana Mayfield

Charlotte City Council’s meeting Monday night over whether to include LGBT people in the city’s non-discrimination law evoked strong comments from the public and Council members. The proposal failed 6-5.

"I don’t think tonight’s vote is about solving a problem. I think it’s about promoting a political agenda," Republican Councilman Kenny Smith said before casting his vote against the measure. "I think if it's passed, it will be a clear message to the city that the City Council has voted to impose the progressive left's view of morality on the majority of our citizens."

Another council member who voted against the measure was LaWana Mayfield. Her vote may surprise some because she’s an openly gay member of Council. She voted no because the final proposal had stripped out a controversial requirement that would have allowed transgender people to use the bathroom of their choice.

In this interview, Mayfield tells WFAE's Sarah Delia that voting yes on the compromise "would have been compromising on all of the friends, the neighbors, those in the community that do identify as transgender…that would be telling them ‘You’re not worthy to be part of this fight with right now.’ ”

Sarah Delia

If you could design your dream home, what would it look like? A big house with a four car garage? Maybe something more modest but efficient. Places like Portland, Oregon and Washington, DC have communities experimenting with small living spaces known as tiny houses. North Carolina has caught on to the tiny house trend—homes that are tiny by nature, but artistically designed for those looking for a more compact way of living without going into much debt. 


Courtesy of Khalid Hill.

Khalid Hill is a professional dancer who lives and teaches tap dancing in New York. This week he’s an artist in residence at UNC Charlotte and he’s performing multiple times throughout his stay. Hill says tap dancing is more than a performance; it’s storytelling with a beat.


Dennis Edwards

What does the Muppet Show and burlesque have in common? More than you might think. They both have roots in Vaudeville theater. Both have a combination of dance, theater, and humor, although burlesque definitely has more…skin. In Charlotte, one burlesque troupe has a growing audience. But the cast isn’t made up of professionals, they’re individuals dedicated to learning the craft.  


Photo by Scott Bigelow, UNC-Pembroke.

The state of North Carolina installed its newest poet laureate after some controversy swirled around the position last July. 


Sarah Delia

It’s harder to make hand-made soap than you might think—there’s chemistry, calculations, and patience. One woman does the whole process from her tiny kitchen in Charlotte, using an ingredient that may seem…counter intuitive.

The Discovery Of Selma

Jan 22, 2015

A powerful Civil Rights Era painting called Selma now has a permanent home at the Mint Museum. It was painted fifty years ago by an Alabama artist, but was just found in 2013. WFAE’s Sarah Delia has the story on the painting’s discovery and its journey to Charlotte. 


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