Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

The death of rocker Tom Petty in October 2017 came as a result of an accidental drug overdose with a toxic mix of drugs taken for several ailments, including a fractured hip.

The results of an autopsy were released Friday by Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner Jonathan Lucas.

Petty died at 66 of "multisystem organ failure due to resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest due to mixed drug toxicity," according to a brief statement.

The drugs listed included "fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetylfentanyl, and despropionyl fentanyl."

A Kentucky man who allegedly tackled his neighbor, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, in a dispute over their adjacent yards has been charged with assaulting a member of Congress resulting in personal injury, a felony under federal law.

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Indiana announced the charge brought against Bowling Green, Ky., resident Rene A. Boucher.

The 59-year old Boucher has agreed to plead guilty to the federal charge.

Almost a year after President Trump tried to bar travelers from some predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, the Supreme Court announced Friday that it will consider a legal challenge to the third version of that ban.

The Justice Department late Thursday announced that it has asked the Supreme Court to overturn a lower court ruling that prevents President Trump from ending the Obama-era program that shields certain young undocumented immigrants from deportation.

That program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, also grants work permits to about 700,000 immigrants brought to this country illegally by their parents.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET Friday

The prime minister of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, has announced that she is pregnant with her first child and will take a six-week break from her official duties to give birth.

In what may be a groundbreaking move, Ardern's plan follows what was already shaping up to be a different approach to both political power and motherhood.

President Trump's long-awaited announcement of the "Fake News Awards" was temporarily delayed Wednesday when the website of the Republican Party, where the awards were to be listed, crashed.

But the site recovered and the awards were unveiled.

All in all, 11 "winners" were listed, beginning with New York Times columnist Paul Krugman:

The U.S. Navy announced Tuesday that the commanding officers of two vessels involved in separate collisions in the Pacific Ocean last year will face court-martial proceedings and possible criminal charges including negligent homicide.

The statement by Navy spokesman Capt. Greg Hicks says the decision to prosecute the commanders, and several lower-ranking officers as well, was made by Adm. Frank Caldwell.

Updated at 8:20 p.m. ET

The last hospitalized victim from the Sutherland Springs church massacre in November, 6-year-old Ryland Ward, was released from University Hospital in San Antonio on Thursday and departed in grand style: He rode home in a fire truck.

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A week after announcing a dramatic expansion of offshore drilling in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said the Trump administration will grant an exception for the state of Florida.

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