Nick de la Canal

Contributor

Nick is a freelance journalist covering arts, culture, and politics in Charlotte, NC. Previously he interned with the WFAE news team and with NPR's Morning Edition in Washington, DC. He graduated from Emerson College with a degree in journalism. Send him a tip at nicholas.delacanal@gmail.com

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Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Think back to the last time you picked up a hula hoop. Probably not since you could write your age with a single digit, right?

Well, it doesn’t have to be that way. Spin Revolution is a Charlotte-based group that promotes serious hooping for all ages. Every week, the small group meets in the back of a photography studio near uptown to practice their craft, and what may seem like a silly plastic toy, gives some hoopers a feeling of spirituality.


Nick de la Canal/WFAE

 If driving down I-77 is part of your daily commute, you’ll probably agree a solution is needed for the growing congestion on the interstate. North Carolina’s Department of Transportation intends to add toll lanes to ease traffic and potentially provide the state with extra income. But as the plan enters its final stages, the state is experiencing some significant pushback.


Stantec/NCDOT

The North Carolina Department of Transportation is hoping to relieve congestion on I-77 by adding two toll lanes. NCDOT officials came to the Charlotte Chamber Wednesday to talk up the project, but as WFAE’s Nick de la Canal reports, there are still basic questions that haven’t been answered.

  DOT officials made a hard sell to the Regional Transportation Committee Wednesday for adding toll lanes between Charlotte and Mooresville on I-77.

IllicitOhio.com

If you’ve been in the area long enough, you’ll remember Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, the televangelists who built a sprawling religious theme park in Fort Mill in the 1980s. A scandal led to the park closing its doors. Now, a new evangelical ministry is hoping to restore parts of the old theme park, but as WFAE’s Nick de la Canal reports, there’s a fear that history may repeat itself.


Nick de la Canal/WFAE

A group of clergy abuse survivors is criticizing the Catholic Diocese of Charlotte for its handling of sexual abuse cases. This comes on the heels of a meeting between Pope Francis and abuse survivors yesterday, and the recent dismissal of criminal and civil sexual assault cases in the Charlotte Diocese.


Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Fireworks will light the Charlotte skyline tonight in what’s billed as the southeast’s largest fireworks show. There will also be plenty of unofficial fireworks displays on rooftops and in backyards across the region. It’s not legal to buy aerial explosives in North Carolina, so to get the good stuff, North Carolinians are streaming across the border this week.


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Correction: This story includes a correction. The original reported the wrong number of freight trains on Norfolk-Southern's line between Charlotte and Mooresville. 

The planned Red Line commuter rail between Charlotte and Mooresville is getting dealt a major setback. Charlotte had arrangements to share existing tracks with the Norfolk Southern Railway Company, but that’s no longer the case.

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Third graders in North Carolina who aren’t reading at grade level started summer reading camps this week. It’s part of the new third grade reading law. Last year state officials predicted 60 percent of all third-graders would have to enroll in the camps, but in reality, that number is much lower.


Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Six years ago, a group of young women were picked to take part in a special program. The girls were all in the seventh grade, all were Latinas, and all were deemed to be at risk of dropping out of school or becoming pregnant. The program is run by a volunteer group called Circle de Luz. And last week the group – and the young women they mentored – had reason to celebrate

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

The number of unintentional deaths from opiate overdoses in North Carolina has more than tripled from 1999 to 2012, when there were more than 600 reported deaths. Last year, state lawmakers attempted to address the growing problem with legislation that makes it easier for drug users to obtain an overdose-reversal drug called naloxone, or Narcan. WFAE’s Nick de la Canal takes a look at how that drug is being distributed and used to prevent overdose deaths.

Last November, Louise Vincent and Adam Wigglesworth visited some friends in Greensboro.

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