Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

scales of justice
Scott*/Flickr

On Monday, Judge Douglas McCullough of the North Carolina Court of Appeals resigned his seat.  Some 36 days before he turned 72, which is the mandatory retirement age of the court.  The reason, McCullough says was simple. "I retired at that time because I did not want my legacy to the court to be the elimination of my seat and the impairment of the court."

Sherry Chisenhall
Marshall Terry / WFAE

It's an uncertain time for the newspaper business. Revenues and newsrooms are shrinking – as the digital revolution expands. The Charlotte Observer has certainly undergone a lot of change. It had a full-time newsroom staff of about 260 just over a decade ago. Now, it’s near 60.  Sherry Chisenhall took over this month as the new executive editor of the Observer. 

"Today, we have to be smarter than ever about what we spend our time doing," Chisenhall says.

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry about the mission of the Observer, the changes it's undergone, and the future of the paper.

Charlotte School of Law
Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law is on its way to becoming a non-profit. It's part of the plan to get the law school's federal loan money re-instated. WFAE's Lisa Worf has been following the school's struggles since the American Bar Association placed the law school on probation this past fall. She joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

Questions still remain about why it took leaders of Mecklenburg County's health department eight months to realize at least 185 women weren't notified of abnormal cervical cancer screenings.  County commissioners heard about the error in a closed session meeting in January. Public Health Director Marcus Plescia says a nurse failed to do her job, and her supervisor didn't catch it.  They and two others involved in the incident are no longer with the health department. The problems became public last month after Fred Clasen-Kelly with the Charlotte Observer began inquiring about it.  He joined WFAE’s Marshall Terry.

Kelly McEvers, host of Embedded
Stephen Voss for NPR

Three-and-a-half years ago, a dash board camera recorded an encounter leading up to CMPD officer Randall Kerrick shooting and killing a young, unarmed black man named Jonathan Ferrell. Shortly after, then CMPD police chief Rodney Monroe described it this way:

"As the officer approached him, just to determine if he's in fact the individual, what's going on," Monroe says. "He immediately, runs toward an officer. At the same time, the officer tries to retreat, while at the same time firing his weapon."

CMPD charged Kerrick with voluntary manslaughter. A year later, a judge declared a mistrial in the case.  The jury viewed that video and came to different conclusions. A new season of the NPR podcast Embedded explores that case and why police video is rarely conclusive. NPR's All Things Considered host Kelly McEvers also hosts Embedded. The new season begins today.  She joined WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Benjamin Benschneider

Author Erik Larson is drawn to events in history that once captivated the nation, "and then, for whatever reason, became forgotten more or less," he says. 

Larson writes about The 1893 Chicago World's Fair in "The Devil in the White City."  The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 in "Isaac's Storm."  And the sinking of the Lusitania in his most recent book, "Dead Wake."

http://www.theciaa.com/information/staff/bio/Jacqie_McWilliams?view=bio

The CIAA basketball tournament is underway this week in Charlotte. It's a major economic event - city officials say last year's tournament generated more than $57 million.

Of course, a lot has changed since last year’s tournament. Now, there’s House Bill 2. The NCAA, ACC, and the NBA have all pulled events from North Carolina in protest of the law.

The CIAA did move some of its championship events out of the state, but decided to keep its signature basketball tournament in Charlotte. We met up with conference commissioner Jacqie McWilliams in uptown to discuss the decision to keep the tournament in Charlotte, which has also served as the CIAA’s headquarters since 2015.

justice.gov

The chief federal law enforcement officer in Charlotte is warning about a startling rise in heroin use. 

"It's a problem that began with prescription pills," says Jill Westmoreland Rose, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina. "But it's one that has grown to epic proportions. Our deaths in this district have doubled in the past year. It's a problem that's affecting all segments of our community."

Charlotte mayor Jennifer Roberts has all but ended any possibility of the city taking another look at contributing city funds to pay for a major league soccer stadium, under the plan as it exists now.  During an interview with the Charlotte Business Journal last night, Roberts said that isn’t going to happen under “this structure and deal,” which calls for the city to kick in about $44 million toward building the stadium.    The city last week cancelled a hearing and vote on the plan.  Earlier this week, Mayor Roberts said city funding for the project was still possible, but only if certain

David Kejr

When you think of the harp, you probably think of classical music.  Not experimental improvisation.  But that is exactly the approach harpist and Shelby-native Mary Lattimore takes.  She runs her harp through effects and loopers to get a layered sound which can fill a room. Lattimore is performing in Charlotte on Thursday. 

Pages