Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

The Target store on Sam Furr Road in Huntersville was evacuated Monday after a fire broke out in the store.   It happened around 5 p.m.. Three customers and a store employee were treated for smoke inhalation.  No one was seriously hurt.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students will graduate Saturday. Many wondered if this day would ever come – not because law school is so tough, but because it wasn't clear whether the for-profit school would still exist after the department of education yanked its federal loan money in December.

But Charlotte School of Law is still fighting to stay open and its graduating class will soon be preparing for the bar and trying not to let the school's troubles hurt their career prospects.

iNaturalist.org

Wildlife officials in North Carolina are doing something new to track alligators. They're asking you to snap a photo of a gator on your phone when you see one and then post it to a website that will record on a map where the photo was taken.

Scott*/Flickr

On Monday, Judge Douglas McCullough of the North Carolina Court of Appeals resigned his seat.  Some 36 days before he turned 72, which is the mandatory retirement age of the court.  The reason, McCullough says was simple. "I retired at that time because I did not want my legacy to the court to be the elimination of my seat and the impairment of the court."

Sherry Chisenhall
Marshall Terry / WFAE

It's an uncertain time for the newspaper business. Revenues and newsrooms are shrinking – as the digital revolution expands. The Charlotte Observer has certainly undergone a lot of change. It had a full-time newsroom staff of about 260 just over a decade ago. Now, it’s near 60.  Sherry Chisenhall took over this month as the new executive editor of the Observer. 

"Today, we have to be smarter than ever about what we spend our time doing," Chisenhall says.

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry about the mission of the Observer, the changes it's undergone, and the future of the paper.

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law is on its way to becoming a non-profit. It's part of the plan to get the law school's federal loan money re-instated. WFAE's Lisa Worf has been following the school's struggles since the American Bar Association placed the law school on probation this past fall. She joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

Questions still remain about why it took leaders of Mecklenburg County's health department eight months to realize at least 185 women weren't notified of abnormal cervical cancer screenings.  County commissioners heard about the error in a closed session meeting in January. Public Health Director Marcus Plescia says a nurse failed to do her job, and her supervisor didn't catch it.  They and two others involved in the incident are no longer with the health department. The problems became public last month after Fred Clasen-Kelly with the Charlotte Observer began inquiring about it.  He joined WFAE’s Marshall Terry.

Kelly McEvers, host of Embedded
Stephen Voss for NPR

Three-and-a-half years ago, a dash board camera recorded an encounter leading up to CMPD officer Randall Kerrick shooting and killing a young, unarmed black man named Jonathan Ferrell. Shortly after, then CMPD police chief Rodney Monroe described it this way:

"As the officer approached him, just to determine if he's in fact the individual, what's going on," Monroe says. "He immediately, runs toward an officer. At the same time, the officer tries to retreat, while at the same time firing his weapon."

CMPD charged Kerrick with voluntary manslaughter. A year later, a judge declared a mistrial in the case.  The jury viewed that video and came to different conclusions. A new season of the NPR podcast Embedded explores that case and why police video is rarely conclusive. NPR's All Things Considered host Kelly McEvers also hosts Embedded. The new season begins today.  She joined WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Benjamin Benschneider

Author Erik Larson is drawn to events in history that once captivated the nation, "and then, for whatever reason, became forgotten more or less," he says. 

Larson writes about The 1893 Chicago World's Fair in "The Devil in the White City."  The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 in "Isaac's Storm."  And the sinking of the Lusitania in his most recent book, "Dead Wake."

http://www.theciaa.com/information/staff/bio/Jacqie_McWilliams?view=bio

The CIAA basketball tournament is underway this week in Charlotte. It's a major economic event - city officials say last year's tournament generated more than $57 million.

Of course, a lot has changed since last year’s tournament. Now, there’s House Bill 2. The NCAA, ACC, and the NBA have all pulled events from North Carolina in protest of the law.

The CIAA did move some of its championship events out of the state, but decided to keep its signature basketball tournament in Charlotte. We met up with conference commissioner Jacqie McWilliams in uptown to discuss the decision to keep the tournament in Charlotte, which has also served as the CIAA’s headquarters since 2015.

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