Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication.  He divides his time between delivering newscasts during the day at the top of every hour and reporting on everything from hot peppers to a museum dedicated to the theory that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina.    Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways To Connect

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

Like many 18-year-olds, Cheridan Gowan of Cherryville is going off to college this fall.  She’ even got a full-ride scholarship through her sport.  It’s not basketball, softball, or tennis.  It’s rodeo. She’s headed for Howard College, right in the middle of one of the most competitive parts of the country for rodeo, west Texas.

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

The debate over the Confederate flag has spurred another debate:  what to do with the Confederate monuments on public property throughout the South. Some are calling for their removal, like Charlotte NAACP President Corine Mack.

“Anywhere where taxpayers are paying for that property, they should be removed," Mack says.  "In fact, I think it would be fine to put it in a museum and have them on display there. So if you choose to go and find out about the history, you have the right to do so.”

Mack has support from Mecklenburg County Commission Chairman Trevor Fuller. But there are also commissioners who say removing them is in effect burying the past. Commissioners will discuss these monuments Tuesday night. Meanwhile we wanted to check out some of these monuments ourselves. Morning Edition host Marshall Terry did so with UNC Charlotte history professor David Goldfield.

Karen Briggs played with composer and keyboardist Yanni for more than a decade, and appeared on his best-selling "Live at the Acropolis" album. Briggs has also added her violin to symphony orchestras, Latin music, and even hip hop. She’s recorded with Wu Tang Clan, for instance. This weekend she’ll be in Charlotte as part of the Queen City Jazz Fest. We reached her by phone at home in North Hollywood.


North Carolina General Assembly

Wednesday night was a busy night in Raleigh. First, House lawmakers voted 79-36 to override the governor’s veto of a bill that will allow employers to sue workers who secretly take pictures or record audio in their place of business. The Senate had already voted to override the veto, which means the bill will become law.


Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

Now time for another story in our periodic series Block by Block, looking at how neighborhoods are changing, in big and small ways.  A longtime fixture of Charlotte’s Plaza Midwood is closing this weekend.  For nearly 40 years, John’s Country Kitchen has been a place where friends gathered at the counter to catch up over pancakes and a cup of coffee. A place where new friendships were forged and old ones were rekindled.  The restaurant's owners are moving on to other things because the landlord of what’s become a prime space on Central Avenue is upping the rent. We recently stopped by on a busy morning and took a seat at the counter.

www.equality-of-opportunity.org

If you’re poor and grow up in Mecklenburg County, you have among the worst chances in the country of climbing the income ladder as you get older. That’s according to a study by a group of researchers at Harvard, who looked at the earnings records of millions of families. The study found poor children in Stanly County, just two counties over, have a much better chance at earning more money as adults. 

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

Charlotte is known for its trees. Its tree canopy covers about 47 percent of the city. Don McSween has been a big part of growing it. For 33 years, he was in charge of maintaining and protecting the canopy as city arborist. He just retired, and on his last day on the job, McSween invited WFAE's Marshall Terry to go with him to one of his favorite tree spots in Charlotte: the line of oaks that hover over Tryon uptown. There we talked about his time as arborist and how he got into the work.


This weekend marks the 150th anniversary of the largest surrender of Confederate troops during the Civil War. It took place near Durham. North Carolina state history and tourism officials have been trying something new to get young people interested in the Civil War and to promote the role North Carolina played.  They’ve set up a Twitter account in the name of a real-life 19th century Lincolnton woman named Mary Chestnut. And to make "Mary’s tweets" about the Civil War more relatable to a modern audience, they’ve added references to today’s pop culture. Jeff Miles is the Department of Culture Resources web content manger and he joins WFAE's Marshall Terry to talk about the Twitter project.

ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

Sarah Delia / 90.7 WFAE

Saturday is a sort of national holiday for record collectors:  it’s Record Store Day. First held eight years ago, Record Store Day was created to boost traffic in local record stores with the release of special, limited items. The sorts of things record collectors geek out about, like different colored vinyl or reissues of obscure albums. WFAE’s resident record geeks, Marshall Terry and Sarah Delia stopped by Lunchbox Records in Charlotte to see how it’s preparing for the big day.


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