Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways To Connect

Mark Rumsey / UNC Charlotte - University Archives / WFAE

It's a big day in the Charlotte area's professional baseball history. The new 10,000 seat BB&T Ballpark uptown debuts tonight when the Triple-A Charlotte Knights take on the Norfolk Tides.

The Knights had spend the previous 24 seasons in Fort Mill, South Carolina.

The region has a long and colorful history of professional baseball. WFAE's Mark Rumsey captured that history in this story, which first aired last summer. 


Denise Cross Photography

Last week a federal judge ruled that some North Carolina lawmakers will have to release emails they exchanged with lobbyists as they were working on the state's sweeping new election law. The judge's order addresses a key question in the lawsuits brought by the U.S. Justice Department and others against the state: How far does the concept of legislative immunity go?


The federal corruption case against former Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon is generating a lot of talk, and questions.  Many of those questions concern what could happen as the case proceeds in the federal judicial system.  WFAE's Mark Rumsey discussed some of the possibilities with UNC law professor Richard Myers, a former assistant U.S. attorney who specializes in white collar crime cases.

Following an arrest, Myers says there are often negotiations before the defendant is indicted. He likens the discussions  to a “multi-dimensional chess game.”

The downfall of Charlotte mayor Patrick Cannon is hitting home with those who preceded him in the office.

Pat McCrory, who served seven terms as the city's mayor before becoming North Carolina's governor, vowed Thursday to take an active role in winning back voters' trust in the mayor's office.   Another ex-mayor of Charlotte, Harvey Gantt, served from 1983 to 1987.

WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with Gantt about Cannon's arrest on federal corruption charges, and the role of mayor under Charlotte's "Council/Manager" form of government.

Mark Rumsey / WFAE

At first glance, Davidson looks like one of those quaint, picturesque towns fit for a postcard.
So a homeless man sleeping on a bench outside a church immediately stands out.
Look a little closer, and you may realize it’s a sculpture of Jesus. Yes, a Homeless Jesus.
The sculpture has sparked a lot of debate since it was installed a week ago.
It’s also received national and even international attention.

In January, 1961, ten young African-Americans were arrested after they sat down at an all-white lunch counter at a variety store in downtown Rock Hill, South Carolina.   Nine of those who were arrested chose to serve 30-day jail sentences rather than win their release by paying bail.   The protesters came to be known as the "Friendship Nine" and their story has previously been told in a South Carolina ETV documentary, "Jail, No Bail".   Now, children's author and Shelby, North Carolina native Kimberly Johnson has written a book about the events titled "No Fear For Freedom: The Story Of The Friendship 9".   WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with Ms. Johnson.

More information here about the Friendship Nine and about children’s author Kimberly Johnson’s book, “No Fear For Freedom - The Story of the Friendship 9

Monday marked the 150th anniversary of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley's sinking of the Union warship Housatonic off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina.    The Hunley also sank during that historic mission and remained submerged until 2000.  Today, the submarine is kept in a laboratory in North Charleston where visitors can see it and researchers continue to explore the events of a century-and-a-half ago.   WFAE's Mark Rumsey discussed that research with Dr. Stephanie Crette, director of Clemson University's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, which is helping supervise the restoration work.

Snow and ice are ensnarling traffic, cancelling flights and causing some power outages in the Charlotte area.

John Tomko is a meteorologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in South Carolina.

“Before this all wraps up tomorrow at lunchtime, storm total snow around seven inches in the Charlotte area," he said, "a little higher to the north and west.”

WFAE's Michael Tomsic has this update on the conditions:

Let's start with traffic – what are the roads like?

Appalachian Voices

Engineers with Duke Energy are working to fix a broken drain pipe under a coal ash storage pond in northern North Carolina. As much as 10 percent of the coal ash in the pond may have spilled into the Dan River, just south of the Virginia state line. WFAE's Ben Bradford updates Morning Edition Host Kevin Kniestedt on the situation.


We’re learning more about the state’s decision earlier this month to terminate an $85 million contract for a new tax return processing system. Documents released today show the state and the company it hired to build the system didn’t agree on how close the final phase of the system was to being ready. WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen talks about the story with "All Things Considered" Host Mark Rumsey.  

MR: Duncan, give us a little re-cap here; how far along was the new tax processing system?

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