Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

CMPD officer Vinson (bottom left) speaks to police officers about the shooting of Keith Scott.
CMPD video

 

CMPD officer Brentley Vinson will not be charged in the shooting death of Keith Scott.

"After a thorough review and given the totality of the circumstances and credible evidence, it is my opinion that officer Vinson acted lawfully," Mecklenburg County District Attorney Andrew Murrays said during a press conference Tuesday Morning.

Todd Sumlin / Charlotte Observer

A federal judge on Monday approved Dylann Roof’s request to represent himself in his hate crimes trial in Charleston.  Roof is charged in the June, 2015 killings of 9 worshippers at Emanuel AME Church.  

U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel reluctantly granted Roof's request to represent himself in the death penalty case, calling it "unwise." Roof's court-appointed lawyers can still assist in his defense. 

North Carolina election officials are still trying to resolve questions about votes cast in Durham County in this month's election.  And, Gov. Pat McCrory's campaign this weekend gave the first hint that an end to its protest of election results could be in sight.  

US Government

The votes are still being tallied in North Carolina's governor's race.  Governor Pat McCrory trails Roy Cooper by more than 6,000 votes. McCrory's campaign has disputed results in 52 counties alleging voter fraud. We wanted to ask the McCrory campaign about its complaints, but no one from the campaign responded to WFAE's interview requests. However, North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes did and spoke to All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

If your plans for Thanksgiving week include a road trip, you can expect plenty of company on the highways. AAA Carolinas projects that 2 million people in North and South Carolina will travel at least 50 miles from home for the holiday. That's an increase of about 2 percent over the number who made driving trips last Thanksgiving. 

NC.gov

Friday's deadline for counting all votes in this month’s election in North Carolina is being extended. The state Board of Elections says county boards need more time to complete their vote counts. The state board cites several factors including ongoing reviews of absentee and provisional votes, along with election protests filed in some counties. 

The outcome of this year's governor's race in North Carolina remains up-in-the-air as provisional and absentee ballots continue to get counted.  Democrat Roy Cooper is now ahead of Republican incumbent Pat McCrory by just under 5,000 votes. 

But McCrory is suspicious of about 90,000 votes reported late from early voting in Durham County.  While Cooper has declared victory, McCrory has questioned the legitimacy of the vote ever since Election Night.

Wildfires in western North Carolina have burned about 40,000 acres since late October. State officials on Monday said eight major fires continue to burn in several mountain counties. Nearly 1,600 firefighters including some from out-of-state are battling the wildfires. WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with N.C. Forest Service spokesman Brian Haines about the ongoing efforts to contain the flames.

Charlotte City Council members Monday evening will consider a proposed redevelopment project near Dilworth - a plan that includes more than $4 million in public funding. 

Some voters may be wondering where their legislative representatives stand today on North Carolina's House Bill Two.  A direct answer may be more elusive than you think.  

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