Lisa Worf

Assistant News Director

Lisa Worf traded the Midwest for Charlotte in 2006 to take a job at WFAE. She worked with public TV in Detroit and taught English in Austria before making her way to radio. Lisa graduated from University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in English. She covers several different areas with a focus on education. 

Ways to Connect

For nearly a year North Carolina has been front and center in the debate about which bathrooms transgender people can use, thanks in large part to House Bill 2.

Now, with the Trump administration's new guidance on transgender student bathroom use, there are a lot of questions about what this means for our state.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

It took Mecklenburg County's Public Health Department several months to notify 185 women that their cervical exams came back abnormal. On Wednesday, the county's health director apologized and said they're fixing the problem, but he wouldn't say why no one caught it sooner. 

The county first learned of the problem in early January. A nurse practitioner noticed a patient hadn't received the follow-up she needed based on her cervical cancer screening and started asking questions. The problem was much larger.

Still from Twitter Video by @ajcookcsa

Students at four CMS schools walked out of class Friday in support of area immigrants. South Mecklenburg High School dismissed classes early after several students say peaceful demonstrations got out of hand.  

Videos of South Meck's walkout posted on Twitter show hundreds of students outside. 

Junior Gletzy Alas helped organize South Meck's walkout. Her parents are immigrants from Honduras.

Robert Lahser / Charlotte Observer

Former Mecklenburg County Manager Harry Jones passed away from pancreatic cancer Wednesday. He helped steer the county for more than a decade and, in recent years, mentored  those struggling with cancer. 

Jones was hired as county manager in 2000, after serving nearly a decade as an assistant manager. At the time, the county was rapidly expanding and figuring out how to deal with that growth made for some tension on the board. Republican County Commissioner Jim Puckett says Jones knew how to relate to people and that was a big help with the board's dynamics.

Democrats have another proposal to repeal HB2. This one offered by Governor Roy Cooper at a time when lawmakers are under a lot of pressure to do away with the law. Cooper calls it a "common sense compromise." Republican leaders and LGBT advocates have their doubts.   

Governor Roy Cooper introduced legislation Tuesday that would not only repeal House Bill 2 in its entirety, but would enact stricter penalties for certain crimes committed in public bathrooms, and require local governments to give at least 30 days notice before voting on new non-discrimination ordinances.

At a morning press conference, Cooper said he was confident the compromise would pass, and that it would satisfy major sports leagues like the NCAA, ACC, and the NBA that previously moved championship games out of North Carolina in response to HB2.

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

There was a bit of movement on the future of Charlotte School of Law over the weekend. The school says it plans to stay open until the end of 2019, so that its current students can graduate from the school. It's not clear what would happen after that. The only problem is that the Department of Education refuses to grant federal loans to any of the school's students. Charlotte School of Law is banking on a new administration to reverse that decision.  Joining All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey is Lisa Worf.   

MR: So what's the school's plan to gradually wind down?

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law students are wrapping up their second week back to classes after the Department of Education yanked all federal loans to the school. The school has refused to close and that decision means students can't have their debt forgiven.  WFAE's Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey now:

Video from Officer Bell's dash camera:

Video of two CMPD officers fatally shooting an 18-year-old last June seems to corroborate the officers' accounts. Police stopped Smith on North Tryon after he shot someone in the ankle on a CATS bus. CMPD released the video Thursday after a judge issued an order for police to do so. The body and dash cam video is the first to be released under a new state law that requires requests for police video to go through court.  

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Last week, we reported that the troubled Charlotte School of Law paid graduates deemed at-risk to delay taking the bar and enroll in a bar preparation course. This program came about a few years ago as it had become the state’s largest law school with the poorest record of graduates passing the bar.

Today, WFAE’s Lisa Worf reports on secret recordings of a law school official that shed light on how much the deferral program inflated bar passage statistics.

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