Lisa Worf

Assistant News Director

Lisa Worf traded the Midwest for Charlotte in 2006 to take a job at WFAE. She worked with public TV in Detroit and taught English in Austria before making her way to radio. Lisa graduated from University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in English. She covers several different areas with a focus on education. 

Ways to Connect

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

It became apparent about three years ago that Charlotte School of Law had a dilemma. The for-profit school that opened in 2006 had admitted too many unqualified students. Many failed out and others who graduated couldn't pass the bar. That bar passage rate is an important way to recruit new students and one of the reasons it came under scrutiny by its accreditor the American Bar Association. So Charlotte School of Law leaders came up with a creative solution. 

The North Carolina Board of Education and the new state schools superintendent sat down this week for their first meeting. Republican Board Chairman Bill Cobey introduced his new GOP colleague. There was no hint that Johnson and the board are locked in a power struggle.

The disagreement is over which one of them is in charge of the Department of Public Instruction. Republican lawmakers say it's Johnson. The board says it's them. That struggle will begin playing out in court soon. WFAE's Lisa Worf joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now. 

Julie Rose / WFAE

Charlotte School of Law is not planning to enroll any new students this coming semester and it's unclear classes will resume for current students.

Julie Rose / WFAE

As of January 1, the Charlotte School of Law can no longer receive any federal loan money. In making the decision, the U.S. Department of Education says the law school has long been out of compliance with ABA standards and gave no hint of those problems to students.

The superintendent of the school system that serves Hagerstown, Maryland, is the next superintendent of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. The CMS board Tuesday announced the hiring of Clayton Wilcox. He begins July 1.

CMPD

Two CMPD officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old man in June will not face criminal prosecution. The Mecklenburg County District Attorney says officers Michael Bell and Garret Tryon were justified in using deadly force against Rodney Smith. Part of the evidence that helped prosecutors come to that decision was video from one of the officers body camera. 

Governor-Elect Roy Cooper was largely silent while Governor McCrory’s campaign and supporters filed complaints and demanded a partial recount in Durham County. But Cooper is now talking more since McCrory finally conceded this week. Cooper spoke to us today. We discussed House Bill 2, his plans for working with Republican lawmakers, legislative redistricting – and the timing of McCroy’s decision to concede.

Governor Pat McCrory concedes to challenger Roy Cooper in a video released by the governor's office.
N.C. Governor's Office

Nearly a month after Election Day, Republican Governor Pat McCrory has conceded the race to Democrat Roy Cooper. 

Usually concession speeches happen in ballrooms surrounded by a crowd. McCrory's took place on a couch in front of a Christmas tree with a camera rolling. 

Community Charter School

One of Charlotte's oldest charter schools will either close at the end of this school year or face a dramatic change. The State Board of Education voted Thursday to allow another charter to take over Community Charter School. 

NC.gov

It's looking more likely that Democrat Roy Cooper will become North Carolina's governor. By state law, Republican Governor Pat McCrory has the right to demand a statewide recount, if the margin is less than 10,000 votes. He got ahead of the game and made that demand last week before counties had finalized all votes. But as the tally stands now, McCrory doesn't have that right. The margin has expanded to 10,256 with results from nearly all counties official.

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