Gwendolyn Glenn

Reporter

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Gwendolyn Glenn

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members want to give themselves about a 34 percent pay increase in next fiscal year’s budget.  

Gwendolyn Glenn

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Superintendent Clayton Wilcox presented an ambitious budget to school board members last night that will require an increase of $40 million from the county. Wilcox’s budget calls for additional security at schools, a pay raise for teachers and more mental health care support for students.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

CMS budget discussions begin Wednesday night with the unveiling of the superintendent’s proposed spending plan for next fiscal year.

Gwendolyn Glenn/ WFAE

The report card is out on how the nation, states and some urban school districts have done over the past two years. It shows that not much has changed.

Gwendolyn Glenn/ WFAE

Fewer Native American public school students in North Carolina are dropping out of school, and more are graduating. But academically, they have made only slight gains in math and reading. That's according to the State Advisory Council on Indian Education’s annual draft report, presented to state school board members on Wednesday. 

Gwendolyn Glenn

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox said the district has not seen the achievement gains it had hoped for at Project LIFT schools. 

Students at W M Irvin Elementary, one of five Restart Schools in Concord, start the day off with series of exercises. Their teacher says it makes them more focused and ready to learn.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

School administrators often complain that they lack flexibility when it comes to improving their schools academically. In response, state education officials created the Restart program two years ago to help struggling schools. The program gives those schools a say in spending state funds, on calendar schedules and hiring flexibility—similar to charter schools. There are more than 100 Restart schools statewide.

Gwendolyn Glenn

Four proposals for the vacant Eastland Mall site were presented to the City Council Economic Development Committee members today. All of the proposals were mixed-use projects with themes ranging from the arts and sports, to millennial housing and family entertainment.

Lisa Worf/ WFAE

For about three decades, beginning in the 1970s, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools was a national leader when it came to integration. Now, CMS is the most racially and economically segregated school district in the state, according to a new report. It found that the number of racially and economically segregated schools statewide increased from nearly 300 in 2006 to close to 500 last year.

Gwendolyn Glenn

CMS released a report last month showing that huge achievement gaps exist in district schools along racial and economic lines. School officials are asking for public input on how to narrow this gap as they set goals for the next six years. They are holding a series of meetings with the first one held today.

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