Gwendolyn Glenn

Reporter

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

In a visit to Charlotte Friday, the state’s new School Superintendent Mark Johnson says he looks forward to revamping student testing, which is one of his top priorities. He says a big flaw in testing is that results are not available in a timely manner where teachers can use them to improve student instruction. Johnson says the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced No Child Left Behind and gives states more leeway in education policy, offers the state the opportunity to implement better testing requirements.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Federal Immigration officials say it's business as usual in terms of last week’s arrests of immigrants in the country illegally. There were nearly 700 arrests nationwide and 84 in North Carolina. The crackdown, as President Trump called it, has some Charlotte residents nervous. Many made their concerns known at Tuesday night’s school board meeting.

Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Crime is down slightly in North Carolina schools, but overall, offenses in Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools are up.

A lawsuit filed in federal court in Greensboro Monday challenges North Carolina’s sex offender registration laws, saying they are unconstitutional.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Providing hope to students who feel left behind and inspiring students to exceed their expectations is what Clayton Wilcox says is the most important aspect of his job as the next CMS superintendent. At his first press conference Tuesday, Wilcox says he has a lot to learn about the issues CMS faces but feels he has what it takes to move the district forward. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn was at the press conference.


Courtney Mason in her classroom at Piney Grove Elementary.
Lisa Worf / WFAE News

Many teachers across the state are set to get belated Christmas gifts in the form of merit bonuses, pending a vote this week by the state board of education.

General Assembly members approved nearly $14 million last year to reward teachers whose students showed growth in third-grade reading and passed advanced placement and international baccalaureate exams.

NC Wine and Grape Council

North Carolina’s wine industry recently got a PR boost with a federally-designated, AVA wine district. AVA stands for American Viticultural Area and the new wine region is in the Appalachian High Country AVA.  


Julie Rose / WFAE

The for-profit, Charlotte School of Law’s accreditation is in jeopardy. This week, the American Bar Association put the school, the state’s largest law school with about 800 students, on probation over concerns that unqualified students were being admitted and that too many graduates were not passing the bar exam.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

As college tuition continues to rise, some lawmakers and education advocates are calling on schools to spend more of their tax-exempt endowment funds on scholarships for low-income students. Those with endowments in the billion-dollar level are especially targeted by critics, who accuse school administrators of hoarding the endowment money.

Universtiy of North Carolina at Charlotte campus
Wade Bruton / UNCC

Since the recession, endowments at public and private colleges and universities have bounced back to the tune of more than a half trillion dollars. But that hasn’t stopped increases in tuition at most schools, to the chagrin of some congressional leaders and others who accuse schools of hoarding endowment funds.

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