Gwendolyn Glenn

Reporter

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Lisa Worf

It was a long and often contentious night for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools board members Wednesday as they voted to approve a student assignment plan that takes effect in 2018.  There was agreement on parts of the plan but also close votes along racial lines, including a failed motion to delay a decision on the plan for a couple of weeks.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Some controversial parts of the proposed student assignment plan for Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools are being revised in preparation for a board vote on it Wednesday night.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members are set to vote on the controversial student assignment plan on Wednesday. If approved, 7,100 students -- 5 percent of CMS’ enrollment -- would shift to new schools. Most are elementary students, such as those at three prek-8 schools in West Charlotte. The plan would break these schools up, but many parents find the proposed changes unsettling.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

Tuesday night, the CMS school board meets to review the proposed student assignment plan and alternative proposals. The changes planned for William Amos Hough and Hopewell high schools are surely expected to come up.


Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools' proposed student assignment plan drew a big crowd Tuesday night. So many people turned up, many had to watch the public hearing on TVs outside the meeting chamber. It was an orderly crowd. About 90 people spoke. Many of them supported the plan, but just as many opposed it, mainly because their children would change schools under it. WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn discusses the meeting with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Next Tuesday the CMS board will hold a hearing on the student assignment plan Superintendent Ann Clark unveiled last week. The board has scheduled a vote on it later this month. Over the next couple weeks, we’ll break down how people are digesting the plan. There’s a range of feelings. In some cases, relief, excitement. In others, anger and concern. There are a lot of questions all around about the challenges ahead. 

Complicated and conservative is how some are describing the student assignment plan CMS officials unveiled at Tuesday night’s school board meeting. Superintendent Ann Clark took questions about the proposed plan Wednesday during a Facebook Live discussion.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Driving a school bus is important work with a lot of responsibility. Drivers have to get students to and from school, safely and on time. The hours are odd, a lot of patience is required and the pay isn't great. All reasons CMS officials often struggle to fill the positions, especially this year.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Thirteen Charlotte elementary schools are hoping to get some of the same flexibility as charter schools. It could be granted under the state’s Restart initiative, an effort to turn around academically struggling schools. CMS board members signed off on the applications but are divided on its merits.

Courtney Mason in her classroom at Piney Grove Elementary.
Lisa Worf / WFAE News

According to the annual CMS human resources report, the district has made a lot of progress in terms of filling teacher positions, but salaries and retention are still an issue.

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