David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

The Charlotte Observer / Jeff Siner

[One Year Later: The Anniverary of the Keith Lamont Shooting and Protests]

“I stayed because the questions needed to be answered and I felt like if there was a role that I could play, it was in making sure the community wasn’t shoo-shooed away saying, ‘Hey, it’s tough, deal with it later.’”

The next day he woke up and his image was all over the world.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Story updated 6:30 p.m.

Last month the Charlotte Citizens Review Board issued a split decision on whether CMPT Officer Brentley Vinson should have been disciplined for the fatal shooting of Keith Scott. But the board unanimously approved policy recommendations for the department. CMPD Chief Kerr Putney revealed some of the board’s suggestions and responded to them today. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn was at the press conference and joins Nick de la Canal in the studio.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police say the city's latest murder victim and suspect knew one another before a fatal shooting Tuesday off Beatties Ford Road. Twenty-six-year-old Derricka Banner of Lenoir, a transgender woman whose legal name was Derrick Lee Banner, was found shot to death around 3 a.m. Tuesday in a vehicle on Rosetta Street.  

Two incumbents and two newcomers won Democratic nominations for Charlotte City Council at-large seats in Tuesday's primary. 

Updated at 9:55 p.m.
With most of the vote counted, two incumbents and two newcomers were leading Tuesday's Democratic primary for Charlotte City Council at-large seats. 

Incumbent James Mitchell (19.4 percent) was leading the race for four slots. Activist and political newcomer Braxton Winston and incumbent Julie Eiselt both had about 17 percent, and current 5th District council member Dimple Ajmera was leading in the race for the fourth slot, with 13.3 percent. Ryan McGill (12.1 percent) and incumbent Claire Fallon (11.2 percent) followed. 

The four nominees will face three Republicans in November. 

Audio Pending...

Updated 10:36 p.m.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts conceded victory to Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles Tuesday in Charlotte's Democratic mayoral primary. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Lyles had about 46.2 percent to Roberts's 36.2 percent. Joel Ford was a distant third with about 15.9 percent.

Once the results are certified, Lyles will face Republican Kenny Smith in the general election on Nov. 7. 

Updated 2:50 p.m.
Tropical Storm Irma is bringing closings and cancellations around the region, from school districts in western North Carolina and South Carolina to flights at Charlotte Douglas International Airport.  Here’s a partial list, which we’ll update as new listings arrive: 

David Boraks / WFAE

A big question as people prepare for Hurricane Irma around the Southeast is: "Will my cell phone work in the storm?" Carriers are mobilizing this week to make sure the answer, hopefully, is yes.

The 10-year plan includes upgrading power lines and systems across Duke's North Carolina grid.
David Boraks / WFAE

Electric utilities are preparing for the possibility of widespread power outages if Hurricane Irma blows into the Carolinas next week.  Forecasters say the mostly likely problem will be wind.

Jose Hernandez-Paris of the Latin American Coalition spoke at a press conference near the Charlotte office of Sen. Thom Tillis Tuesday.
David Boraks / WFAE-FM

President Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA, brought a range of reactions in North Carolina. Congressional Democrats called it a betrayal and cold-hearted. Republicans applauded, though they disagree on how far to go with a law to replace DACA. Immigrant advocates hope for a compromise to help DACA's so-called "dreamers." 

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