David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Police in riot gear march down Trade Street toward the Omni Hotel during protests Sept. 21, 2016, after the killing of Keith Lamont Scott.
David Boraks / WFAE

CMPD and the City of Charlotte say they're studying a consultant's recommendations for changes in police training, transparency and other policies. Those came in a report from The Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., hired by the city after demonstrations following the fatal police shooting of a black man last year. 

All the panelists joined a Q&A in the second hour of the forum "Unrest in the Queen City: One Year Later" at Spirit Square.
Erin Keever / WFAE

A year after the killing of Keith Scott, Charlotte is still debating both police shootings and the social and economic inequality that led to a week of protests. Just how well CMPD and the city are doing was the question Wednesday night during a two-hour Charlotte Talks Public Conversation at Spirit Square in uptown Charlotte.

Duke already has installed large battery systems elsewhere, like this one at a wind farm in Texas.
Duke Energy

Duke Energy plans to install its first two large-scale battery storage units in 2019 in western North Carolina.  A nine-megawatt battery system will be installed in Asheville and a four-megawatt system is planned in Hot Springs, in Madison County.

The Police Foundation review team at Wednesday's meeting, from left: chief operating officer Blake Norton, Roberto Villasenor, Frank Straub, and the Rev. Jeffrey Brown.
David Boraks / WFAE

A final report is due out soon from an independent group hired to review CMPD policies and community relations after last year’s shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. But it won't include any scrutiny of the shooting itself. 

Architect's drawing of the planned Ally Charlotte Center, at South Tryon and Stonewall streets. Crescent Communities plans to start construction early in 2018.
Crescent Communities

Another new office tower will begin construction uptown early next year, with Ally Financial as the main tenant. Besides offices, the 26-story building at South Tryon and Stonewall streets will have a hotel and space for restaurants and shops.  It's expected to open in 2021.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the police killing of Keith Lamont Scott – and the birth of a protest movement called Charlotte Uprising.

The street protests that followed Keith Scott's killing brought all kinds of people to uptown Charlotte - longtime activists, students, uptown professionals, and local clergy. Within a couple of days, many were rallying around a social media hashtag - #CharlotteUprising.

A main building on the site once was a Ford Model T factory and Army missile plant. More recently, it was a Rite-Aid distribution center.
David Boraks / WFAE

The Charlotte City Council on Monday approved a rezoning for the 72-acre Camp North End development off Statesville Avenue, north of uptown.  

Civil War reenactment at Historic Brattonsville in 2016.
Culture & Heritage Museums / Mike Watts

Historic Brattonsville in York County,  S.C., says it's canceling a planned Civil War re-enactment next month amid the national debate over Civil War memorials and concerns over visitors' safety.

The Charlotte Observer / Jeff Siner

[One Year Later: The Anniverary of the Keith Lamont Shooting and Protests]

“I stayed because the questions needed to be answered and I felt like if there was a role that I could play, it was in making sure the community wasn’t shoo-shooed away saying, ‘Hey, it’s tough, deal with it later.’”

The next day he woke up and his image was all over the world.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Story updated 6:30 p.m.

Last month the Charlotte Citizens Review Board issued a split decision on whether CMPT Officer Brentley Vinson should have been disciplined for the fatal shooting of Keith Scott. But the board unanimously approved policy recommendations for the department. CMPD Chief Kerr Putney revealed some of the board’s suggestions and responded to them today. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn was at the press conference and joins Nick de la Canal in the studio.

Pages