David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Corning will expand its optical fiber plant in Midland, in Cabarrus County.
Corning Inc.

Corning Inc. says strong demand for optical fiber and cable is bringing another expansion in North Carolina. The company said Monday it will spend $176 million in Catawba and Cabarrus counties and create 410 jobs over the next two years.   

Duke Energy is removing coal ash from basins near the retired Riverbend Plant, near Mountain Island Lake.
David Boraks / WFAE

Duke Energy this summer will ask North Carolina regulators to raise the rates consumers pay on their electricity bills for the first time in four years. The rate hikes – at Duke’s two electricity subsidiaries in the state - would help pay for new plants, Hurricane Matthew recovery costs and coal ash cleanups.

A loss on the sale of its international operations contributed to an overall loss of $227 million at Duke Energy for the last three months of 2016. Duke on Thursday also reported that its profit for all of 2016 was down about 24 percent, to $2.1 billion.

But after adjusting for one-time expenses, the report was in line with analysts' expectations. Duke’s shares closed the day up 2.7 percent. 

Hundreds gathered at Marshall Park in uptown Charlotte Thursday for a pro-immigrant rally.
Tom Bullock / WFAE

Immigrant communities nationwide and in Charlotte staged “A Day Without Immigrants” Thursday. They’re protesting a wave of recent arrests by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers in the first major immigration crackdown by the new Trump administration.

Governor Roy Cooper introduced legislation Tuesday that would not only repeal House Bill 2 in its entirety, but would enact stricter penalties for certain crimes committed in public bathrooms, and require local governments to give at least 30 days notice before voting on new non-discrimination ordinances.

At a morning press conference, Cooper said he was confident the compromise would pass, and that it would satisfy major sports leagues like the NCAA, ACC, and the NBA that previously moved championship games out of North Carolina in response to HB2.

Manolo Betancur owns a bakery on Central Avenue. He spoke at Friday's event at the Government Center.
David Boraks / WFAE

Federal immigration agents have arrested more than 680 people nationwide since last week, including more than 100 in the Carolinas, in the Trump administration's first major crackdown on people in the country illegally.  U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly acknowledged the operations in a statement Monday, saying about three-quarters of those arrested were a threat to public safety.  But local immigration lawyers and immigrants say the new administration is sowing fear by casting a wider net.

Hector Vaca of Action NC speaks at a press conference by Latin American and African American leaders Friday at the Government Center.
David Boraks / WFAE

Federal officials say there's nothing new or different about how they've been arresting people for immigration violations in Charlotte this week. But the arrests raised fears in the city's Latin-American community. Many see it as part of a nationwide anti-immigrant campaign led by the White House.

Manufacturers are waiting to see if President Donald Trump follows through on threats to slap new import fees on U.S. companies with factories in Mexico. That includes Charlotte-based Nucor, the largest U.S. steelmaker, which says it’s moving ahead with a plant in central Mexico.  

There are two bids for a Major League Soccer team from North Carolina. Charlotte's has received a lot of attention. But there's also a bid up the highway in Raleigh. And there are significant differences, beginning with competing social media hash tags: #MLS4CLT and #919toMLS

Duke Energy is removing coal ash from basins near the retired Riverbend Plant, near Mountain Island Lake.
David Boraks / WFAE

A new Duke University study has found high levels of selenium in fish at two lakes near Duke Energy coal-ash sites in North Carolina. But Duke Energy says its own studies have found no problems with fish from the lakes.

Pages