David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Organizers say they're expecting thousands of people uptown Saturday for the Charlotte Women's March. It's the anniversary of big demonstrations in Washington and around the country the weekend President Donald Trump was inaugurated.

Organizer Jan Anderson attended last year's Washington rally, but says she's staying in Charlotte this time.

Many side roads, like this one in Charlotte's University area, are still covered in snow after Wednesday's storm blanketed much of North Carolina.
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

State police have responded to more than 2,300 crashes statewide in the past two days, after a winter storm dumped snow across most of the state. In a press conference Thursday morning, Governor Roy Cooper urged drivers to stay off the roads.

Adam Calderone of Urban Ministry Center's outreach team talks to a homeless man on South Tryon Street Wednesday.
David Boraks / WFAE

An estimated 1,400 people are homeless in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. Finding them is the biggest challenge for those who provide shelter and other services. That job falls to the outreach staff from the Urban Ministry Center -- a sort of emergency response team. WFAE's David Boraks rode along on Wednesday as they checked on homeless people uptown.

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan spoke at a Charlotte World Affairs Council lunch Wednesday at the Hilton.
David Boraks / WFAE

The new tax law is having a short-term negative effect on profits at the nation's banks. Most, like Bank of America which reported earnings Wednesday, have announced big one-time charges that cut into profits. But overall, the new law is a good thing for banks. 

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Mecklenburg County will open an emergency shelter for the homeless at the Grady Cole Center on Kings Drive for the next couple of days as winter weather returns to the Charlotte area.

Coal ash is being excavated from Duke Energy's closed Riverbend coal plant on Mountain Island Lake.
David Boraks / WFAE

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein is opposing Duke Energy's request to charge ratepayers for the costs of cleaning up its coal ash dumps around the state.  

Charlotte women marched in Washington, D.C., one year ago, then returned to Charlotte to help form a new women's organization. From left, Marsha Ford, Ellen Dalton Creede, Jan Anderson, Toni Freeman, Kay Ethridge.
Kay Ethridge

One year ago, hundreds of thousands of women marched - in Washington, Charlotte and other cities around the country. Their goal was a louder voice for women as President Donald Trump started his presidency.  In Charlotte, those 2017 marches spurred formation of a new women's group. It meets regularly and has organized an anniversary march this Saturday uptown.

A worker delivers bottled water to a home in Belmont, near Duke Energy's Allen coal plant. Duke will provide a permament drinking water supply to well owners by 2018.
David Boraks / WFAE

People who live near Duke Energy's North Carolina coal ash dumps on Thursday marked 1,000 days of living on bottled water, amid fears that their wells are contaminated. They're calling on lawmakers to adopt stronger groundwater standards to prevent contamination of private wells. And they want Duke to dig up and secure coal ash statewide - not just at a few sites as now required.

Duke is close to announcing coal-ash basin closure plans for a half-dozen plants, including the Marshall Steam Station on Lake Norman.
David Boraks / WFAE

Duke Energy has agreed to pay an $84,000 fine and will speed up coal ash cleanups at three coal-fired power plants in western North Carolina. The proposed agreement with state environmental regulators deals with pollutants seeping from coal ash ponds near the Marshall plant on Lake Norman, the Allen plant in Gaston County and the Rogers plant in Rutherford County.

An architect's drawing of the proposed Charlotte Gateway Station on West Trade Street.
Charlotte Area Transit System

Charlotte Area Transit System and NCDOT have lined up funding and nearly completed design work on the on the planned Charlotte Gateway Station uptown.  Planning for the  project began more than a decade ago. The idea is to put passenger rail, the Gold Line streetcar and local and intercity buses in one place.

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