David Boraks

Reporter

David Boraks covers energy & the environment, politics & government, transportation and other topics for WFAE.  He previously worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

David Boraks/ WFAE

Duke Energy says state regulators' Friday order denying its request for a rate hike in its western North Carolina territory could still mean a small rate increase for customers. 

Duke Energy headquarters in Charlotte.
David Boraks / WFAE

State regulators have rejected Duke Energy's request for a rate increase and instead ordered slight rate reductions in its western North Carolina territory, including Charlotte. The order doesn't say exactly what Duke's new rates will be, and it's still possible some customers could see slight rate increases.

Border patrol car patroling on border
By Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

At least five children who were separated from their parents at the U.S. southern border have been placed in foster care in South Carolina. In North Carolina, officials who resettle immigrants say they're not aware of any children currently being housed in the state after being separated from their families at the border. But they say the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy is affecting immigrants already here.

Jaki Shelton Green
Courtesy of Office of Governor Roy Cooper

Writer and poet Jaki Shelton Green has been named North Carolina's ninth poet laureate. She's the first black woman to receive the honor. Green replaces Shelby Stephenson, who has been poet laureate since 2015.

David Boraks / WFAE

The season is over for Charlotte's startup indoor football team, the Carolina Energy. On Saturday, they lost a playoff game to the league-leading Richmond Roughriders, 57-43, in Richmond. 

Workers build concrete barriers along I-77 north of Charlotte, as part of the I-77 Express Lanes project.
I-77 Mobility Partners

State legislation to fund a possible buyout or changes to the North Carolina Department of Transportation's I-77 toll lane project near Charlotte has died. That's according to state Sen. Jeff Tarte (R-Cornelius), who wrote a key amendment to provide the funding.  

The Supreme Court of the United States.
Matt Wade / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on two closely watched gerrymandering cases Monday but sidestepped the main issue — whether it's illegal to draw districts to give an unfair advantage to one party.  Experts say the issues could be more clear cut in a North Carolina case pending before the court. Justices could announce as early as next week if they plan to hear the case this fall.

Construction on the I-77 toll lanes and related projects like this bridge is continuing.
I-77 Mobility Partners

A state auditor's report out Tuesday has found nothing improper about the North Carolina Department of Transportation's nearly $650 million contract with a private company to build toll lanes on I-77, or in the way the contract was awarded. 

JOSH STEIN

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein says a proposed settlement that would allow Duke Energy to begin charging customers for electric grid improvements is unfair to ratepayers. That's in a filing with utilities regulators Friday in response to Duke's proposed agreement with a group of environmental and business groups.  

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Updated 6:01 p.m.
The U.S. Supreme Court issued rulings Monday in two gerrymandering cases, from Wisconsin and Maryland, that are being closely watched in North Carolina. But the rulings don't touch on the key issue, whether it's legal to redraw districts to give an unfair advantage to a political party.

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