David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

Governor Roy Cooper
WRAL.com

House Bill 2 is no longer on the books. Gov. Roy Cooper signed a bill Thursday afternoon to repeal and replace the controversial law. The measure easily passed the state House and Senate earlier in the afternoon. Those who oppose the repeal include people who both supported and opposed House Bill 2.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Jmturner (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The North Carolina House of Representatives followed the Senate's lead Thursday afternoon, voting 70-48 to repeal and replace the controversial House Bill 2.  It passed the Senate earlier, 32-16. Although some thought the votes would be close, House Bill 142 passed in both houses with support from both Democrats and Republicans.

CMPD Capt. Cecil Brisbon talks about the spike in murders in Charlotte this year at Wednesday's weekly police briefing.
David Boraks / WFAE

Random shootings aren’t what’s driving the tripling of murders in Charlotte this year. Charlotte Mecklenburg Police say it’s usually an argument between people who know each other that escalates into a fatal shooting. Twenty-two people have been murdered in the city since Jan. 1. 

Duke Energy is removing coal ash from basins near the retired Riverbend Plant, near Mountain Island Lake.
David Boraks / WFAE

Updated 1:43 p.m.
Duke Energy is suing 30 insurance companies over who should pay to clean up toxic coal ash at its coal-fired power plants in North Carolina. The utility says any money it recovers in the suit will help reduce future rate increases to pay for cleanups.

Architect's drawing of the planned InterContinental Hotel, above a renovated Carolina Theatre at Sixth and Tryon streets in Charlotte.
Foundation for the Carolinas

The long-awaited renovation of the Carolina Theatre in uptown Charlotte is scheduled to begin in May. That's according to the Foundation for the Carolinas, which owns the property. The foundation also announced Tuesday it has investors lined up for a luxury hotel to be built above the theater.

It's way past the deadline set by Congress - 35 years past - but women are organizing in North Carolina and nationwide around a bit of unfinished business: ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment.

UNC Basketball

Sophomore Luke Maye hit the winning jump shot Sunday night to send the University of North Carolina into the Final Four of the Division 1 men’s basketball tournament. But his status as an overnight hero didn’t keep him from showing up at his 8 a.m. class Monday morning.

Here’s what’s in the headlines at midday Monday here on WFAE:  

Charlotte Area Transit System is asking Charlotte City Council to approve another $25 million for the Lynx Blue Line Extension. The project extends the light rail line nine miles from uptown to UNC Charlotte.

ICE officers making an arrest.
Immigration & Customs Enforcement

Ever since President Donald Trump's executive orders in January, immigration officials have insisted that when it comes to enforcement, it's business as usual - mostly. Statistics are hard to come by, especially at the local level. But there are signs of a shift at Immigration Customs & Enforcement, or ICE.

Rowan County offices in Salisbury.
Rowan County

The First Amendment prohibits establishment of an official religion in the U.S.  When a government body steers too close to that, federal courts have stepped in to decide what's legal and what's not.  The federal appeals court in Richmond, Virginia, now is considering a case from Rowan County, northeast of Charlotte. At issue is whether county commissioners should be allowed to lead Christian prayers before their meetings. WFAE's David Boraks has been following the case, and talked with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

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