David Boraks

Environmental Reporter

David Boraks covers Energy and the Environment and other topics for WFAE. He also has worked as a "Charlotte Talks" producer (2015-16) and as weekend host (2007-2016). He's a veteran Charlotte-area journalist who previously published the online community news network that included DavidsonNews.net and CorneliusNews.net (2006-2015).

He also has worked for American Banker (2000-2005), The Charlotte Observer (1993-2000), The China News in Taipei (1991), The Cambridge (Mass.) Chronicle (1989-1991) and The Hartford Courant (1986-89).

David has a bachelor's  degree in history from Cornell University and a master's degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.

http://atlanticcoastpipeline.com/
Atlantic Coast Pipeline

A federal environmental review has found that the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline would have some negative effects on water, forests and endangered species. But the pipeline's builders call the report favorable overall and say it clears the way for final approval. 

Marcus Smith of MLS4CLT presented his soccer stadium plan to the City Council's Economic Development Committee meeting Thursday.
David Boraks / WFAE

A group hoping to bring a Major League Soccer team to Charlotte asked a City Council committee Thursday for financial help building a new soccer stadium. The Economic Development Committee's chair says any city contribution will be far less than the $44 million originally requested. The leader of the MLS bid says he can work with that.

The proposed soccer stadium would be on state-owned land at Peace and Salisbury streets in Raleigh. Its "skin" would have LED lighting that changes colors.
North Carolina FC

A day after visiting Charlotte, Major League Soccer executives were in Raleigh Wednesday to take a look at that city's competing bid for a new professional soccer team. The visit included a major announcement - a new roofed stadium and entertainment complex at the north end of downtown Raleigh. 

charlotte soccer stadium
MANICA Architecture/Major League Soccer

Major League Soccer officials will be in Charlotte and Raleigh this week as they try to decide where to put two expansion teams later this year. A dozen cities are competing for new franchises. WFAE's David Boraks  has been covering the two North Carolina bids and talked with "Morning Edition" host Marshall Terry. 

Architect's drawing of the planned InterContinental Hotel, above a renovated Carolina Theatre at Sixth and Tryon streets in Charlotte.
Foundation for the Carolinas

The Foundation for the Carolinas is asking the city for $4.5 million to make up a shortfall in fundraising for the Carolina Theatre renovation project uptown. The City Council's Economic Development Committee unanimously recommended the expenditure Thursday, which now goes to the full council for a vote on July 24. 

Major League Soccer officials will be in Charlotte next week for a close-up look at the local bid for an expansion team. But they won't be meeting with county commissioners. That's been canceled after commissioners opposed to county funding for a new stadium demanded the meeting be public.

CC0 Public Domain

The Charlotte City Council's Economic Development Committee has recommended that the full city council change city rules to allow alcoholic beverage sales on Sunday mornings. The proposal will be up for a vote July 24.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department

A Charlotte Mecklenburg police officer has been charged with misdemeanor death by motor vehicle after he killed a pedestrian while responding to a call on Morehead Street last weekend. 

charlotte soccer stadium
MANICA Architecture/Major League Soccer

Major League Soccer executives will be in Charlotte and Raleigh next week to review competing bids for new franchises and gauge community support for the sport.

Mooresville residents lined up to speak at a Mooresville public hearing June 5 about the mixed-used development.
Town of Mooresville video

Development is booming again in the Lake Norman area. The recession that began in 2008 killed or delayed many projects. But now, new projects are going up from Huntersville to Mooresville. Some residents don't like it - and they're using social media and protests to pressure local officials. Votes are planned this week on two such developments - Monday night in Mooresville and Tuesday night in Davidson. WFAE host Mark Rumsey talked with reporter David Boraks, who has been following the projects.

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