Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

A Note Of Thanks

Nov 23, 2015
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

For a reporter the rule is pretty simple: You’re there to do a job, not be a guest at the event you’re covering.

Family Agriculture Resource Management Service

Here’s a fresh approach to bringing locally-grown fruits and vegetables to older folks who may lack access: a free Senior Nutrition and Produce Event this Saturday, Nov. 21.

Family Agriculture Resource Management Services (F.A.R.M.S.) has partnered with social service and advocacy groups to reach out to low-income seniors whom may not have transportation – or the resources – to obtain the greens, beans, and other garden bounty some of us may take for granted.

The Day After

Oct 30, 2015
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

If you love candy, get ready for one of the three best days of the year. Yes, it's true: the day after Halloween, the day after Easter, and the day after Valentine's Day are a candy lover's dream come true.

That's when stores mark down all of their unsold seasonal treats. 

In Search Of Spices

Oct 23, 2015
Amy Rogers

It sounded like firecrackers, but it wasn’t: four or five rapid pops. Then it happened again. Pop, pop, pop, pop. It didn’t quite register.

The third time, everything stopped: the song-like prayers at the Western Wall, the hum of conversation from the cluster of pilgrims waiting to enter, the easy breathing of two friends who’d put away work for a few hours of touring. 

A Taste Of Pomegranates

Oct 16, 2015
Amy Rogers

Young, lean soldiers armed with machine guns cluster just inside the massive Jaffa Gate. A wooden cart full of pastries stands to the left, near a small fenced green where executions once took place. This is a busy entrance into Jerusalem's Old City, in Israel. 

A map on the wall at the visitors' center displays neat lines to mark the Jewish, Armenian, Christian, and Muslim quarters of the walled village. But on the narrow, cobbled streets there's nothing carved in stone. 

Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Shakshuka changed everything for this breakfast hater. For years I've insisted that "the most important meal of the day" was nothing more than a bland and boring chore.

This morning in Jerusalem, I sampled my first-ever, authentic Israeli breakfast. And that's where I found it: shakshuka, and it made me swoon.

Peach-less In Carolina

Sep 21, 2015
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Unless you're a peach farmer, you may not have noticed that 2015 was a terrible year in the Carolinas. 

But that's what we discovered when we pulled up to Dori Sanders' place for our end-of-season expedition a few weeks ago. There were no peaches for sale at the Sanders' family farm stand in Filbert, S.C. The wooden plank shelves were all but empty. 

Up the hill, we could see the trees laden with rosy-gold fruit under a bright blue sky. What could explain such a scene?

Storey Publishing

Here’s a must-have book for all food lovers. The Food Activist Handbook by Ali Berlow is not a cookbook, but it’s guaranteed to satisfy another kind of appetite: our hunger to make a difference.

Some of the ideas will be familiar: Contribute to a food pantry, plant a school garden, join a food co-op.

Mecklenburg County Cooperative Extension Service/Family and Consumer Sciences

Are you sick of pickles? After a season slammed with cucumbers, your friends at WFAEats were ready to say goodbye to that summer staple.

Once again, Mecklenburg County Cooperative Extension Service came to the rescue with this fun and simple recipe for Garden Cucumber Chips – using nothing more than a home dehydrator and a handful of readily available spices.

1 and ½ large cucumbers, peeled and sliced thin (about 4 cups)

½ teaspoon of olive oil

½ teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon dill weed

All About 'Aquafaba'

Jul 22, 2015
Erin Zimmerman/Vegan Meringue -- Hits and Misses

Here are two words we never see together: “vegan” and “meringue.” That’s because meringues, those sugar-browned peaks atop lemon pie, are made from egg whites. So are macarons, the French cookies sandwiched around jam or other sweet fillings.

Replacing whole eggs in desserts with applesauce or other fruit-based products is easy. But replacing just the egg whites needed for meringue – with an ingredient a home cook can sweeten, whip, and bake – has been almost impossible.