Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

Harvest Baker Tomato Slab Pie
Excerpted from The Harvest Baker © by Ken Haedrich, photo © Johnny Autry, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

Has an avalanche of tomatoes, squash, berries, or beets landed in your kitchen?

Never fear, Ken Haedrich is here to help. He has a new book, The Harvest Baker: 150 Sweet and Savory Recipes Celebrating the Fresh-Picked Flavors of Fruits, Herbs and Vegetables. Even better, he’ll be visiting Charlotte on August 22 and will help you solve your persistent pie problems. 

watermelon balls
National Watermelon Promotion Board

Whoever said there are no holidays in August didn’t know about National Watermelon Day. It’s August 3. We admit it snuck up on us here at WFAEats, so we’re slicing and dicing as fast as we can to get you all the tips you need – along with a few tasty facts to amaze your friends.

Historians believe the watermelon originated in southern Africa where the flowering plant grows wild. Today, China grows more than any other country, about 67 percent of the world’s supply.

pick-up truck transporting fruits and vegetables
Carolina Waterfowl Rescue

If you can peel, chop, slice, and dice your way through baskets and bushels of produce, Carolina Waterfowl Rescue appreciates your kitchen skills.

The all-volunteer organization that cares for injured and abandoned wildlife recently lost their key source of food when a regional grocery chain suddenly withdrew its support. The donations had been in place for three years and ceased without warning, according to Director Jennifer Gordon, who said, “I was in shock.” She took to social media and posted on Facebook: “Does anyone here work in a grocery store or restaurant?”

bowls of popcorn
Aspa / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

Running out of ideas for kids’ activities during the Dog Days of summer? The folks at Mecklenburg County Extension and 4-H have partnered to offer some great programs. And they’re free!

Garden crafts, science, and food-themed activities started back in June but will continue through August. If your kids missed learning to make a basil-seed necklace and a “pizza garden in a glove,” there are plenty of sessions remaining.

Paul Brewington, farmer, holding a dozen eggs.
Rosa Parks Farmers Market

Pack your lawn chair and head to the West End this Saturday for a day of fun and food that will help support local farmers.

It’s a great opportunity to meet, greet, and eat while helping to improve food access in the city’s underserved areas.

Prime Time For A Picnic

May 26, 2017
a picnic
nAok0 / Flickr

Summer may officially arrive on June 21, but everyone knows it truly kicks off on Memorial Day weekend. And that means it’s picnic season.

Credit Dale Haas/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

You can know plenty about the city you call home and still have giant gaps in your knowledge of the place.

Until today, May 16, 2017, I’d never been to Brooks’ Sandwich House. The truth? Until yesterday, I’d never even heard of it. This is despite having driven literally within a block of it, oh, let’s say maybe 50 times, at least.

But when I posted on Facebook that I was headed out at lunch in search of livermush, friends swarmed my page like honey-bees to hollyhocks. They were pretty much equally divided between two camps:

1. Liver…what?
2. Go to Brooks’ immediately.

Some of Elaine Rogers' recipes and newspaper clippings.
Amy Rogers

In honor of Mother’s Day, I thought it would be fun to take a little trip back in time. So I got out my mother’s old recipe box, eager to revisit the tastes of my childhood.

It’s no surprise that for overfed Americans, eating less meat is a good idea. But a new book goes further and shows how simply lessening our consumption of animal products can drastically improve our bodies, minds, and the planet we inhabit.

tea and toast
miss.libertine / Flickr/creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

As the annual celebration of poetry comes to an end, we’re pleased to share two poems from Mimi Herman, the North Carolina 2017 Piedmont Laureate in Poetry.

High Tea

The second time we dine at the Savoy,

I wear the clothes that make my father think

I am his daughter, and perhaps the boy

He thought he’d raised will have Earl Grey to drink.

The lipstick and the stockings and the heels

Disorient my father over scones

And salmon sandwiches, and so he tells

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