Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

carrot salad for WFAEats
Noah Fecks

Welcome to the summer doldrums. It’s too hot to cook. We’re bored with burgers and ho-hum hot dogs. We’re drowning in seas of zucchini.

So it’s time to step away from the stove, pour yourself a cold beverage, and kick back with this six-pack of recently released books.

If you're new to Charlotte -- say, within the last 200 years or so -- you may not know about the city's former reputation as "A Very Trifling Place."

Yes, the city of booming business was once considered to be nothing special. President George Washington visited in 1791 as part of a southern tour following the Revolutionary War. It was he who made that infamous pronouncement about "Charlotte Town" in his diary. 

watermelon
Flickr/Rebecca Siegel https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

When the temp in my car reached 104 this week, I got a little queasy. My friend Karin asked me about the effect of hot weather on our appetites, so I set out to learn more.

Krispy Kreme doughnuts.
Mark Lee / Flickr

In the category of Things That Are Really No Surprise comes a bold new study claiming that humans crave foods that are sweet, fatty, and especially a combination of both. This is not news to those us enjoying a doughnut or a biscuit with jam this morning. Nevertheless, scientists found an interesting tool to use when measuring our desire for these foods: money.  

In a signed copy of his book, Anthony Bourdain left the note: "COOK FREE OR DIE."
Peabody Awards/Amy Rogers / flickr.com

Anthony Bourdain needed to leave Charlotte and catch a plane to his next stop – but the phone wouldn’t stop ringing at Park Road Books. Restaurant dishwashers were calling to say, “I’m almost off shift. As soon as I finish I’m on my way. I want a book.”

But Bourdain had to leave before all of his fans could get there. So the chef-turned-author signed a special stack of books for them.

COMMENTARY:

When it comes to pie, some people like to make things complicated. They have secret recipes and techniques cloaked in mystery.

Well, today I’m going to show you how to make your next pie the easiest ever. You don’t even need an oven to create your own perfect No-Bake Foolproof Key Lime Pie (or Parfaits.)

Mayochup is a mixture of mayonnaise and ketchup.
Courtesy of Heinz

COMMENTARY:

Now that cook-out season is here, a new condiment may be heading your way: mayochup.

Put simply, it’s a blend of mayonnaise and ketchup. But nothing in the world of food marketing is ever simple.

Olivia Pellin will represent the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools as the district's representative at the national conference for Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.
Amy Rogers / WFAE

In case you missed it, while famous chefs were winning James Beard awards recently, some local culinary pros were also taking top honors for their work. But these aren’t the purveyors of fine food at swanky eateries. 

renata maia

In a world of over-the-top cocktails, a new trend is brewing: simpler drinks made from fewer ingredients, and with lower levels of alcohol.

“Coffee folks: Who is making the switch from Starbucks to another coffee store owned by people of color or other minorities?” If you want to know what people think about a hot-button issue, post a question on social media. So on Wednesday afternoon, I did, and within seconds people began responding. 

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