Amy Rogers

Coordinator of WFAEats

Amy Rogers is the author of Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her writing has also been featured in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, the Oxford American, and the Charlotte Observer. She is founding publisher of the award-winning Novello Festival Press. She received a Creative Artist Fellowship from the Arts and Science Council, and was the first person to receive the award for non-fiction writing. Her reporting has also won multiple awards from the N.C. Working Press Association. She has been Writer in Residence at the Wildacres Center, and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. Amy Rogers considers herself “Southern by choice,” and is a food and culture commentator for NPR station WFAE.

What’s your favorite childhood food memory? Watching my mother in a gorgeous cocktail dress sneak into the kitchen before a party so she could eat some real food.

What’s your typical breakfast? Coffee, with a side order of extra coffee

What can you always find in your fridge? Half-and-half. Because you can put it in coffee, tea, cereal, frittatas, and lots of leftover things like tomatoes, potatoes and shellfish to make cream-of-whatever soup.

Kitchen tool(s) you can’t live without? I lived and cooked wonderful meals for literally decades with only one chef’s knife. I now have others but rarely use them.

If you aren’t in the kitchen, where are you? Visiting farm stands, markets, cafes, friends’ homes – anywhere there’s food to be sampled and enjoyed.

Amy Rogers’ website

blueberries growing on a bush
PhreddieH3, [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Silly gardeners. While we've been sweating and struggling in the summer heat, the smart folks at the NC Cooperative Extension Service have been coolly building a giant online resource for us. Sponsored by N.C. State University, the Extension Gardener Handbook can solve just about any problem -- and enhance the experience of gardening for everyone. So pour yourself a cold beverage, find a shady spot, and check it out. 

Popo le Chien / Wikimedia Commons

The popularity of hummus is exploding in America, drawing comparisons to the rise of Greek yogurt.

Local hummus-makers can try to impress a hummus expert of sorts during the upcoming Charlotte Jewish Film Festival. Filmmaker Alex Matros will judge a hummus contest in conjunction with the showing of “Life and Hummus.”

jar of dates
Amy Rogers / WFAE

This is not the week anyone planned to have, and this is not the story I planned to write. Our most eloquent voices are struggling to find the words to make sense of the latest atrocities, not to mention those we rightly fear may be coming.

Thursday night, Charlotte’s Muslim community invited the public to partake of an Interfaith Iftar dinner to celebrate Ramadan. Several hundred attendees gathered at the Islamic Society of Greater Charlotte.

Amy Rogers / WFAEats

"I will not buy any more cookbooks," you proclaim. And you mean it, too. 

You avoid your favorite bookstore. You steer your cart around the edges of Costco to avoid that mountain of books in the middle. You refuse to click the links to the "Best Of" lists in your newsfeed. You promise the people who live with you, "I will read that giant stack of cookbooks (in the den, next to the bed, on the kitchen counter) before I even think of buying another one."

Sabra Crock

When Dina Cheney discovered she was lactose-intolerant, she did what any resourceful food-lover would do: 

She grabbed a hammer and a screwdriver and started busting open coconuts for their milk. But then she took it further -- much further. She crushed cashews and pulverized pistachios. She soaked and cooked and blended all sorts of nuts and seeds and grains. She enhanced the flavors of the resulting liquids with everything from cocoa to curry.  

YourCastlesDecor / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Just when we think coffee can’t get any more miraculous, here comes the coffee nap.

It sure seems like an oxymoron. How is it possible to pair up getting wide-eyed with getting shut-eye?

It works like this: In the afternoon when fatigue sets in, you drink a cup of coffee, set your alarm for 20 to 30 minutes, then doze off. That's the perfect amount of time to let the caffeine kick in. You'll wake up alert and refreshed. Science says so.

Welcome to the “largest literary celebration in the world,” otherwise, known as National Poetry Month. April also marks the birthday of William Shakespeare.

What does any of this have to do with food? We’re glad you asked. Read on.

Sonnet 75: So Are You to My Thoughts as Food to Life

Oven Fresh / commons.wikimedia.org

While we suffer in the South under piles of pollen, the trees up North are behaving in a much more tasteful fashion. That’s because March is Maple Month, when the sap starts to flow.

Pat Conroy: A Memory

Mar 7, 2016
Amy Rogers

People were in line before the bookstore opened. Hundreds more were arriving to stand on the pavement for hours and wait their turn to enter the cozy shop jammed with easily 100 more. Pat Conroy talked and laughed and reminisced with just about everyone who came to get a book signed.

Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Nobody wants to hear food writers complain about their jobs, and rightly so. But given the recent experience of WFAEats contributor Tamra Wilson -- more about that later --  this is a good time to bust some myths about what food writers actually get to do.

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