NPR News

Pages

Europe
5:04 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Ukraine's Interim Prime Minister To Visit White House

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 7:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
3:44 am
Wed March 12, 2014

In Sports, There's No Such Thing As A Bad Hustle

Pete Rose swings for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1985 season. Rose, aka "Charlie Hustle," famously ran to first base even when he was given a walk.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 7:32 am

Surely, "hustle" is the single most beloved word associated with sport. As color is to rainbows, as chocolate to the palate, as sweet nothings to love, hustle is to sport.

Hear it now:

Hustle up!
Hustle down the line!
Show us more hustle!

And oh, my, how often are you gonna hear this in the weeks ahead during March Madness: They gotta hustle back on defense. That, apparently, is the only way human beings can properly get back on defense.

Read more
Parallels
3:43 am
Wed March 12, 2014

A Magnet For African Migrants, Italy Seeks A New Approach

Migrants sit in a boat during a rescue operation by the Italian navy off the coast of Sicily on Nov. 28. Italy is looking to revamp the way it handles the hundreds of thousands of migrants who arrive annually.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 11:37 am

With mild weather ahead, southern Europe is once again bracing for new boatloads of would-be migrants and asylum seekers from North Africa.

Italy has borne the brunt of this migrant flow for two decades, and it has responded with one of Europe's most repressive laws on illegal immigration.

But now the Italian parliament is trying to scrap a law that has made migrants vulnerable to exploitation and human rights abuses. The existing law has also produced detention camps where undocumented migrants are held in harsh conditions.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:41 am
Wed March 12, 2014

You Might Pay A Lot More Than $95 For Skipping Health Insurance

The tax penalty is designed to encourage people to sign up for health insurance.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 4:08 pm

2014 is the first year most Americans will have to either have health insurance or face a tax penalty.

But most people who are aware of the penalty think it's pretty small, at least for this first year. And that could turn into an expensive mistake.

Read more
Parallels
3:40 am
Wed March 12, 2014

After A Downturn, Global Shipping Bets Big On Everything

A container ship docked at Port Elizabeth in New Jersey. No one on the pier knows for sure what exactly the containers carry — anything from frozen chicken to computers.
Jonathan Blakley NPR

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 11:22 am

On a cold, blustery day at Port Elizabeth in New Jersey, one of several massive cranes whirs along a rail high above the pier, picks up a heavy container from a ship's deck and loads it on a waiting truck back on land. The truck drives away, another arrives, and the whole process starts again.

It's a scene played out every day along America's coasts as massive container ships from across the globe pull into deep-water seaports, waiting to be unloaded. The ships are enormous — some 10 stories high and several football fields long.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:18 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Reports: GM Facing Criminal Inquiry Over Delayed Recall

The Chevrolet Cobalt is one of the GM models being recalled for faulty ignition switches.
David Zalubowski AP

General Motors may be facing a criminal investigation over its delay in recalling vehicles with faulty ignition switches blamed for 13 deaths and 31 accidents, The New York Times and Reuters are reporting.

Both news organizations are quoting a person familiar with the investigation.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:42 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Detainee Lawyer Calls Force Feeding In Guantanamo 'Water Cure' Torture

Clouds cover the sky over Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Pool Getty Images

A lawyer for a group of detainees at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay Cuba is accusing the military of torture.

NPR's Martin Kaste filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The military keeps hunger-striking detainees alive by forcing liquid food down their throats through a tube.

"Courts have refused to intervene, but lawyer Jon Eisenberg says he has new information that may change that.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:12 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

In Closely Watched Election, Republican Jolly Wins In Florida

Republican David Jolly, shown during a Nov. 23 campaign rally in Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., once worked for the late congressman whose seat he's vying to fill. He has called for repeal of President Obama's health care law.
Steve Nesius AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 11:28 am

This post was updated at 10:30 a.m. on March 12.

Republican David Jolly wrung out a victory during a special election in Florida on Tuesday for the Tampa Bay-area district vacated by the late Rep. Bill Young.

As our friends at It's All Politics reported, the neck-and-neck race between Jolly and Democrat Alex Sink was seen as "a proxy for how President Obama and his signature health care legislation will play at the polls in November."

Read more
It's All Politics
7:41 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Feinstein's CIA Outrage Splits Senate

Sen. Dianne Feinstein accused the CIA publicly and at length of hacking Senate computers to spy on Senate aides and remove documents.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 1:07 am

The Senate was a chamber divided in reaction to Democrat Sen. Dianne Feinstein's diatribe against the CIA for allegedly hacking into Senate computers.

A no-nonsense Feinstein, the Senate Intelligence Committee chairman, took to the Senate floor Tuesday to speak at length and publicly for the first time about a dispute with the agency.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:11 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

What Would It Take To Destroy A Black Box?

The flight data recorder from the 2009 Air France flight that went down in the Atlantic.
Johann PESCHEL AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 9:41 am

When a plane crashes, it can take many months or years to find the black box that can provide clues as to what happened. Just what are these devices, how do they work, and why can they be so hard to find? With the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 making headlines around the world, we contacted the recorders division of the National Transportation and Safety Board to find out.

What is a "black box"?

Read more

Pages