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The parents of terminally ill British baby Charlie Gard have ended their legal fight to transport him to the U.S. for experimental treatment, concluding a months-long saga that has raised nearly $1.75 million and elicited support from Pope Francis and President Trump.

The couple's lawyer, Grant Armstrong, told the London High Court that new medical tests have shown that the experimental treatment would not help at this point, according to The Associated Press. "It's too late for Charlie," Armstrong said. "The damage has been done."

America's oldest commissioned warship returned to Boston's waters in shipshape on Sunday night.

It's afternoon, and in a spacious courtyard in Accra, Ghana, children sit at tables and talk to adult mentors. Pat Wilkins, a youthful 52-year-old, firmly asks what they've been learning in school. She peers seriously at them through her glasses. And then "Aunty Pat" — as the kids call her — cracks a smile.

It's this blend of discipline and nurturing that's the foundation of BASICS, a nonprofit organization Wilkins started in 2001 that aims to change lives by guiding low-income children through school and preparing them for skilled jobs.

At least 24 people were killed and 42 were wounded in a suicide bombing in the Afghan capital in the early morning hours on Monday. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack.

The suicide bomber crashed his car packed with explosives into a bus full of government employees in Kabul, the Associated Press reports. The attack took place during rush hour in a western Kabul neighborhood where several prominent politicians reside.

In a surprise move, the Polish president says he will veto two controversial measures that critics say would have undermined the independence of the judiciary. Poland has seen days of protests across the country against the legislation.

President Andrzej Duda is a member of the ruling Law and Justice party, and this is the first time he has broken with his right-wing party, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports. In fact, Duda's critics have referred to him as "pen," Soraya adds, because he has signed all previous bills.

The Shins have been a constant part of NPR's musical DNA for much of the 21st century. The group's poetic pop has shown up in something like 25 stories on our website, not just because many of us are longtime fans, but also because our listeners love them.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This week, the city of Detroit is remembering a series of days that forever changed the iconic Motor City.

Fifty years ago, the city ignited into five days of rioting after Detroit police raided an illegal after-hours club.

People there say police shoved a pregnant woman aside during the raid. Someone else threw a brick at the officers.

Many African-American Detroiters call it a rebellion against systemic racism and decades of harassment by some white police officers.

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