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The Papal Succession
7:46 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Why 'Francis'? The New Pope Explains

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

On the third day of his pontificate, Pope Francis held an audience for the thousands of journalists who've been covering the transition from one papacy to another. And the new pope made it clear that he will try to embody a different style and tone from that of his predecessor, Benedict XVI. He called for an austere church that will serve the poor.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli was in the audience and joins us now from Rome. Sylvia, thanks for being with us.

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:05 am
Sat March 16, 2013

The Naming Of The Shrew

Carl Buell

It looks kinda like a squirrel, except its ears are too small, its tail is ratty, then bushy, and its mouth? Definitely un-squirrel. More like a shrew, a fox, or a dog. And the teeth? Strange. What is it?

It's an act of edited, elegant imagination.

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It's All Politics
5:41 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Rand Paul Wins Conservative Vote In Straw Poll

Members of the college group Young Americans for Freedom roll up Ronald Reagan posters to hand out at CPAC in National Harbor, Md. on Friday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:39 pm

Conservative activists chose Tea Party favorite Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky as their pick to be the Republican presidential nominee in 2016, at the Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

As The Associated Press notes, "the win offers little more than bragging rights for Paul, who is popular with the younger generation of libertarian-minded conservatives who packed the conference."

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The Two-Way
5:17 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Now A Politician, Aung San Suu Kyi Is The Object Of Protesters

Aung San Suu Kyi (right) faced protesters when she traveled to a village in northern Myanmar on Thursday to discuss a Chinese-backed copper mine project. Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate and a member of Parliament, urged protesters to support the project, which was the scene of a violent crackdown last year. She said opposing the project would risk hurting the country's economy.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 1:51 pm

Last year, Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was greeted by adoring crowds during triumphant tours of Asia, the U.S. and Europe. She eclipsed President Thein Sein, who remained in Burma, as the country is also known, and managed a series of domestic crises.

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The Salt
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Wine Revolution: As Drinkers And Growers, U.S. Declares Independence

The vineyard at Round Pond Estate in Rutherford, Calif. Napa Valley is just one of wine-growing regions across the country.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 12:46 pm

A curious shift has happened in global wine-drinking trends: Americans have overtaken the French and Italians, Europe's traditional lovers of the fruits of the vine, as the world's top wine market.

And it's not just wine drinking that's taken off stateside: U.S. wine production is also on the rise.

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Middle East
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Reading The Tea Leaves Of Obama's Mideast Trip

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Middle East
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Despite Incredible Loss, Iraqi Refugee Thankful For Her Life

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Host Scott Simon talks with a 29-year-old Iraqi refugee who now lives in the U.S. She worked for the U.S. Army in Baghdad but had to flee Iraq because it was too dangerous to stay.

Europe
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

In St. Peter's Square, History Unraveled Slowly

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

The eyes of the world were fixed on St. Peter's Square this week as Roman Catholic cardinals elected a new pope. Host Scott Simon reflects on the rituals and the silence that followed Pope Francis's call for prayers.

Music
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Sounds Of Toronto's Streets Liven Symphony

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Host Scott Simon talks to MIT professor of music and media Tod Machover about his work with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He crowdsourced street sounds gathered by local Torontonians and blended them with traditional instruments to create an orchestra.

Iraq
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Letters To My Dead Father

Guffran, 16, sits on the floor of her home, holding a letter she wrote to her father. A Shiite Muslim, Guffran's father was gunned down on the streets of Baghdad in 2006.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Ten years after the U.S. invaded Iraq, NPR is taking a look back, revisiting people and places first encountered during the war. In 2006, NPR aired a story about a 9-year-old girl who loved her father so much, she wrote him letters to take to work with him. Even after he died, in a carjacking that appeared to have a sectarian motive, she still wrote to him.

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