It's All Politics
3:43 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In Arkansas, The Senate Battle Is Already Brutal

Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., speaks at the Rice Expo in Stuttgart, Ark., on Aug. 2.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 5:03 am

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Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Kids With Costly Medical Issues Get Help, But Not Enough

Katie Doderer, with dad Mark, big sister Emily, and mom Marcy, has a rare medical condition that requires 24-hour use of a ventilator.
courtesy of the Doderer family

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:56 am

Katie Doderer is a very poised 15-year-old with short blond hair and a wide smile. She's a straight A student who loves singing, dancing and performing in musicals.

This could be considered something of a miracle.

"I have a complex medical condition known as congenital central hypoventilation – blah—syndrome. CCHS," Katie explains, stumbling on the full name of her malady. "Basically my brain doesn't tell me to breathe. So I am reliant on a mechanical ventilator."

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The Salt
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

A potsticker prepared by Chef Scott Drewno at the Washington, D.C., restaurant The Source.
Heather Rousseau for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 9:35 am

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from?

No one knows for sure, but Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., thinks dumplings have been around for a very long time. "Almost without doubt, there are prehistoric dumplings," he says.

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The March On Washington At 50
3:40 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington.
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:58 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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The Two-Way
3:01 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012.
Ho/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 4:04 pm

Update at 3:14 p.m. ET. Carter Receives Medal Of Honor:

Saying he represented "the essence of true heroism," President Obama presented Army Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter with the nation's highest military honors, this afternoon.

"As these soldiers and families will tell you, they're a family forged in battle, and loss, and love," Obama said, according to the AP.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Army staff sergeant who Monday afternoon will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony has mixed emotions.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Mon August 26, 2013

The Story Of 'Historic' South End (Rebroadcast)

The historic trolley's route started on the backside of Atherton Market. Today the trolley 'carbarn' is a popular farmer's market.
Credit Shook Kelley

 Charlotte's South End wasn't always a hip, vibrant district of shops, restaurants and condos filled with young people that's currently thriving along the city's light rail line. The district right outside of Center City along South Boulevard got its start in the 1850's when the first railroad line came to Charlotte and cotton mills and neighborhoods like Dilworth started to spring up around the rail corridor to house mill workers. But when the cotton mills moved out, South End turned into a vacant, barbed-wired and even dangerous wasteland. We'll talk to some of the people responsible for bringing it back to life about the history of the area from train to trolley to light rail. A look at the surprising story of 'Historic' South End from cotton mills to food trucks, when Charlotte Talks.

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Music Interviews
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Julia Holter's 'Loud City Song' Is A Story On Top Of A Story

Julia Holter's latest album is titled Loud City Song.
Rick Bahto Courtesy of the artist

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Around the Nation
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

The Howl Of The Eastern Timber Wolf

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's August, and that means a lot of us are looking for something out of the ordinary to do. And every August for the past 50 years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear the howl of the eastern timber wolf, once a ubiquitous sound in the wild. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.

RICK STRONKS: OK. How many people are here from outside Canada and the U.S.? Look at that. Amazing.

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Middle East
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

World Reacts To Alleged Syrian Chemical Attack

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, a look at the minority Christian population in the Middle East. But first, this week, video out of Syria showed shocking images of civilians, many of them women and children, choking and convulsing on the floor of a hospital near Damascus. The opposition called it the evidence of a chemical attack.

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Books
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:14 am

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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