The Two-Way
11:56 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Typhoon Usagi Destroys Homes, Causes Dozens Of Deaths In China

A man runs from a huge wave pushed up by Typhoon Usagi on a wharf in China's Guangdong province Sunday. Usagi killed at least 25 people after crashing ashore in southern China.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 1:31 pm

Typhoon Usagi, which stormed ashore north of Hong Kong on Sunday evening, has been blamed for at least 25 deaths in south China's Guangdong province. Some 8,490 houses reportedly collapsed in the typhoon's winds, officials say.

"A total of 5.48 million people were affected and 310,000 residents were displaced due to the storm," reports the Xinhua state news agency, adding that the storm has caused an estimated $1.16 billion in direct economic losses.

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Local News
11:34 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Winthrop Professor Unlocks Mystery Of First African-American Female Novelist

Credit The Bondwoman's Narrative, Beineke Library, Yale University

A novel called The Bondwoman's Narrative was a best-seller in 2002 - about 150 years after it was written. The book is believed to be the first novel penned by an African-American woman. The author was listed as "Hannah Crafts," but no one knew the identify of the writer. That has changed, thanks to the research of Winthrop University professor Gregg Hecimovich. He's the chairman of the Winthrop's English Department. He's identified the author as a former North Carolina slave named Hannah Bond, and his findings are endorsed by prominent scholars such as Henry Louis Gates. Professor Hecimovich spoke to WFAE's Mark Rumsey about his research:


Shots - Health News
11:34 am
Mon September 23, 2013

To Succeed At Breast-Feeding, Most New Moms Could Use Help

That's how it's supposed to work. But for most new moms, breast-feeding doesn't come easily, a study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 8:58 am

The majority of new mothers try to breast-feed. But it's not easy.

Only 13 percent manage to breast-feed exclusively for the six months that are recommended for a baby's health. And, as you might expect, the moms who have trouble with breast-feeding in the first week with a new baby are the ones most likely to give up, a study finds.

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It's All Politics
11:09 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Monday News Clips: What We're Reading

J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 7:11 pm

We're kicking off a new morning routine in which we'll get the day started on NPR's It's All Politics" blog by sharing a handful of political stories that caught our interest or that we'll be watching.

Here are a few of them for Monday, Sept. 23:

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Boston Police Chief Is Stepping Down

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis talks with reporters during the hunt for the Boston Marathon bombers in April.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:45 pm

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis, who became a nationally known figure as he led his department's response to last April's bombings at the Boston Marathon, announced Monday that he's stepping down after seven years in the job.

"It's time for me to try other things," the 57-year-old Davis told reporters. Among the first opportunities he said he may take advantage of is a fellowship at Harvard.

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Mon September 23, 2013

$3.9 Billion U.S. Defense Contract Includes Missiles For UAE

A photo provided by Lockheed Martin shows a test of its THAAD missile interceptor system. The Pentagon has awarded a contract worth more than $3.9 billion for the system.
Lockheed Martin

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:11 pm

The U.S. Defense Department has awarded a rich military contract to Lockheed Martin, agreeing to pay more than $3.9 billion for a missile-defense system. The deal calls for a maximum of 110 high-altitude interceptor missiles for the United States, and 192 versions of the missiles for export to the United Arab Emirates.

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET: Number Of Missiles Adjusted

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Death Toll In Pakistan Church Attack Reaches 85

A woman is carried into the hospital after being injured when two suicide bombers attacked a church in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Sunday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:58 pm

At least 85 people are listed as dead in northwest Pakistan after what's been described as the largest-ever attack on the country's Christian minority.

A pair of suicide bombers blew themselves up Sunday at the historic All Saints Church in the city of Peshawar, not far from the Afghan border.

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The Picture Show
10:51 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Beauty Is In The Eye Of The Bee-Holder

Osmia chalybea, Male, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia
USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 4:55 pm

For a lot of people, the sight of a bee or wasp is enough to elicit some kind of visceral reaction. But a bee at 1:1 magnification becomes something a little more awe-inspiring.

"We know the average American reaction to insects," says Sam Droege, head of the U.S. Geological Survey Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab. But, he says, "At this scale, none of them are ugly."

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NPR Story
10:35 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Bangladesh Garment Workers Protest Over Pay, Factories Shutdown

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with protests in Bangladesh.

Thousands of garment workers in Bangladesh continue protesting today. Dozens have been injured in clashes with police. They're demanding higher wages, seeking about $100 - per month. The demonstrators have forced over 100 factories to closes; factories that supply retailer like Wal-Mart and Gap.

Code Switch
10:33 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Is It Racist To 'Call A Spade A Spade'?

So where did the phrase "call a spade a spade" come from?
andrewasmith/via Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 2:21 pm

What happens when a perfectly innocuous phrase takes on a more sinister meaning over time?

Case in point, the expression "to call a spade a spade." For almost half a millennium, the phrase has served as a demand to "tell it like it is." It is only in the past century that the phrase began to acquire a negative, racial overtone.

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