News

Sarah Delia

Immigration and refugee policies have been on the minds of people across the country, including Charlotte. Tonight WFAE’s Charlotte Talks will hold a Public Conversation event to explore these topics.

For Mayada Idlibi both of these issues hit close to home. She emigrated from Syria in the 1980’s. Today she works with refugees placed in Charlotte.  WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with Idlibi about her journey to America and the challenges of helping refugees settle into their new home.

Protesters Shout Down City Council With Chants Of 'No More ICE!'

Feb 27, 2017
David T. Foster III / Charlotte Observer

By Bruce Henderson & Steve Harrsion

Angry and scared over the Trump administration’s push to deport undocumented immigrants, about 200 protesters shouted down Charlotte City Council at its Monday night meeting with chants of “No more ICE!” and “Do something!”

The protest started at uptown’s Marshall Park. Activists then marched through uptown and filled the council chambers, where they demanded the city’s elected officials “stand up” to the Trump administration. Some cursed at city officials.

Workers lift a girder into place for the Lynx Blue Line Extension over Harris Boulevard in February 2016.
David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte Area Transit System said Monday the Lynx Blue Line Extension won't open for service in August as originally planned. Instead, the 9.3 mile line from uptown to UNC Charlotte will open seven months later - in March 2018. 

CATS CEO John Lewis announced the bus system overhaul at the Transit Center uptown Tuesday.
David Boraks / WFAE

CATS announced Monday a seven-month delay for the opening of the light rail Blue Line Extension from uptown to UNC-Charlotte. The line is now scheduled to open next March.  The completion will wrap up more than a decade of work on the light rail line. So what's next for Charlotte Area Transit System? Three more transit lines to be built all at once, says CATS CEO John Lewis. At least that’s his goal. WFAE's David Boraks has more.

It's been almost two years since the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department began equipping officers with body-worn cameras. Monday night, Charlotte City Council members could vote to more than double the number of body cams available for use by CMPD.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday morning over the First Amendment rights of sex offenders in North Carolina. The justices will consider a North Carolina law that forbids offenders from accessing Facebook and other social media.

Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio and health director Marcus Plescia (left) talk to reporters Friday afternoon.
(via Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio says she's frustrated by accusations that the county tried to cover up big delays in telling women results of their cervical exams. In a press conference Friday afternoon, she said three separate reviews of the situation are planned.

CMS officials say four schools in the district were placed on lockdown Friday in reaction to a student walk out at Garinger High School.

According to CMS, the protest began during Garinger's first period, when approximately 500 students staged a peaceful demonstration in opposition to recent immigration policies. Most of the students returned to class when the second period bell rang, but CMS says 100 students instead walked off campus, prompting neighboring Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School to go on lockdown for about an hour.

More than 6,000 people attended a town hall meeting Thursday evening with Congressman Robert Pittenger, though attend may not be the right word.

The Republican representative decided to hold the event over the phone.

The official reason given for this tele-town hall was that it allowed constituents from all over North Carolina's 9th Congressional District to attend without the inconvenience of a long drive.

Such concern is unnecessary, a caller named Mark told Pittenger (all callers were only identified by first name).

For nearly a year North Carolina has been front and center in the debate about which bathrooms transgender people can use, thanks in large part to House Bill 2.

Now, with the Trump administration's new guidance on transgender student bathroom use, there are a lot of questions about what this means for our state.

Pages