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Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

UPDATED

(10:00 pm) Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles was at the CMPD control center Wednesday night. She spoke with WFAE's Mark Rumsey about the night's events and the investigation into the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott by CMPD Officer Brently Vinson.

"I have confidence that they are going to respect their mission and values in this investigation," said Lyles.

   
http://steinhardt.nyu.edu

The initial outrage over Tuesday's fatal police shooting in Charlotte of Keith Lamont Scott was expressed on a Facebook Live video feed. A woman who identified herself as Scott's daughter recorded a nearly one hour video in which she repeatedly yelled and cursed at officers on the scene.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
Tom Bullock / WFAE

Thursday, September 22

The shooting of an African-American man in the University area on Tuesday afternoon led to protests that became increasingly violent in the overnight hours on Wednesday. Many encouraged on-going protests including a boycott of white-owned Charlotte businesses. City officials encouraged calm and called for dialogue while others say it’s time for systemic change. We're joined by Mayor Jennifer Roberts and other.


Charlotte Observer

This much we know: around 4:00 Tuesday afternoon, Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by police near his north Charlotte home. Protests over that killing turned violent Tuesday night. And Wednesday, two very different narratives have emerged over why Scott was shot. 

In northeast Charlotte Tuesday, a Charlotte Mecklenburg police officer shot and killed a black man. That prompted a night of angry protests. Police say they’re still investigating but here’s what we know:

Officers went to an apartment complex off Old Concord Road to serve an arrest warrant. They saw 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott sitting in a parked car. Police say he got out of the car with a gun, and that’s when officer Brentley Vinson, also an African-American, fired.

Charlotte Mecklenburg police chief Kerr Putney has given more details about a fatal police shooting Tuesday and his department’s response to protests later in northeast Charlotte.

Police fire tear gas into the protest on Tuesday night
Ely Portillo / Charlotte Observer

The streets leading into Old Concord Road were blocked off to vehicle traffic for much of the night, but pedestrians were allowed to walk to and from the protest site. And as WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn reports, people were still heading to the scene after midnight with the smell of tear gas hanging heavily in the air.

CMPD officers blocking Old Concord Rd. at Suther Rd.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Roughly 1,000 protesters marched through portions of the University area Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning in response to a police shooting death of an African-American man.

Roy Cooper
David Boraks / WFAE

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper told a business lunch in Charlotte Tuesday that the laws and policies of Gov. Pat McCrory and Republicans are damaging the state's reputation. Cooper says he'll work with citizens and business leaders to repair it.

Cooper, currently the state’s attorney general, made his pitch for the governor's job at the Hood Hargett Breakfast Club at the Palm Restaurant, where McCrory spoke last week.

People gather on a hill as Charlotte police work the scene at The Village at College Downs apartments on Tuesday, September 20, 2016.
Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

At least a dozen police were injured during protests in Charlotte, following the shooting death by police of an African-American man Tuesday. Police say he was armed, his family says he was not.

WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn has more. 

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