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David T. Foster, III / The Charlotte Observer

Two Project LIFT schools tried something of an experiment a few years ago. They added extra days to the school calendar to help students learn, but those will likely be cut next year. 

Leaders of Project LIFT have used philanthropic dollars to try several new things at CMS schools on the city's west side where students struggle most. They hoped adding 19 days at Druid Hills and Thomasboro k-8 schools would make a difference.  But four years later that doesn't appear to be the case, at least as far as test scores. 

NCGA

House Speaker Tim Moore has given his fellow Republican representatives a bit of homework this weekend.Consider a new plan which would change House Bill 2.

Change, yes, but not a full repeal. WFAE's Nick De La Canal talks with WFAE's Tom Bullock about the proposal.

NDC: Tom, let's  jump right in with the most well-known part of HB 2. Would this plan drop or change the bathroom provisions of the bill?

Rowan County offices in Salisbury.
Rowan County

The First Amendment prohibits establishment of an official religion in the U.S.  When a government body steers too close to that, federal courts have stepped in to decide what's legal and what's not.  The federal appeals court in Richmond, Virginia, now is considering a case from Rowan County, northeast of Charlotte. At issue is whether county commissioners should be allowed to lead Christian prayers before their meetings. WFAE's David Boraks has been following the case, and talked with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

The attorney for Raquan Borum and prosecutors agree on one thing: Borum shot and killed Justin Carr last September during protests in uptown. But they disagree on why. Borum's attorney says it was an accident.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

One year ago House Bill 2 was born. The controversial legislation was passed in a special session of the General Assembly and signed into law later the same day.

On the one year anniversary it seemed something was in the works, that a repeal of HB 2 was, possibly, about to happen. 

Then nothing did.

Today is the fourth and — what is scheduled to be — final day of the confirmation hearing for Judge Neil Gorsuch. Testifying about the Supreme Court nominee will be experts and outside groups. Gorsuch himself will not be taking questions, or in the hearing room.

Those expected to speak on his behalf are judges and former law clerks he has worked with, along with some law school professors and other attorneys. Witnesses called by Democrats, who have concerns about Gorsuch, include other law professors, and representatives from women's and environmental groups.

Teen's Body Found Near Elementary School Baseball Field

Mar 23, 2017
LaVendrick Smith / Charlotte Observer

By Mark Price and LaVendrick Smith

The body of a teenager was found Wednesday afternoon behind Allenbrook Elementary School in northwest Charlotte. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police launched a homicide investigation.

Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, Lewis F. Powell Jr. Courthouse
Taber Andrew Bain from Richmond, VA, USA [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

A federal appeals court will decide whether it's legal for Rowan County's elected commissioners to lead Christian prayers at meetings. All 15 judges on the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments in the case Wednesday in Richmond, Virginia.

Facing outrage from Republican state legislators, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Tuesday reversed plans to use “Jacob’s New Dress,” a picture book about a boy who likes to dress like a girl, in four elementary schools.

The book had been selected as part of the anti-bullying program. After a teacher complained to lawmakers, Charles Jeter, the district’s government liaison, says he talked to both sides to “find a resolution without the General Assembly finding a resolution.”

Davie Hinshaw / The Charlotte Observer

Charlotte School of Law is on its way to becoming a non-profit. It's part of the plan to get the law school's federal loan money re-instated. WFAE's Lisa Worf has been following the school's struggles since the American Bar Association placed the law school on probation this past fall. She joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

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