Public Conversations

Public Conversations is an ongoing series of community forums designed to convene Charlotte-area residents for discussion of timely and relevant topics.  Our goal is to create comfortable settings that encourage a stimulating and enlightening exchange of ideas.  By organizing these Public Conversations, WFAE intends to serve as a catalyst for community dialogue.  Participants are encouraged to engage in conversation with a cross-section of community representatives, expert panelists, and with each other.

Audience Discussion At WFAE's Public Conversation

Jul 14, 2017
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

On July 11, WFAE hosted a public conversation where community members gathered to discuss Charlotte’s rising homicide count. This year there have been 49 homicides – putting the city on track to reach 95 murders this year. That’s a third more than last year. CMPD Chief Kerr Putney noted socioeconomic disparities in minority communities are playing significant roles in the violence.

Bad Theology

Cab drivers pick up all sorts of people going to various destinations: a party, the airport, or to meet up with friends. Those brief interactions are usually just that—short moments of time shared by the passenger and driver making small talk or staring out the window. Nothing too memorable.

But in the movie FARE, written and directed by local filmmaker Thomas Torrey, the protagonist Eric, a cab driver, finds himself transporting a passenger that takes up his entire evening—and changes the course of his life.

Two members of Charlotte City Council are rebuking a report published this week that suggested members had plans to symbolically re-instate the city's nondiscrimination ordinance.

Per Democrat Julie Eiselt: "That's not a thing we're doing right now."

Per Republican Ed Driggs: "It's not where we are right now."

Jennifer Roser / WFAE

The recent shooting by police of Keith Scott and the unrest that followed has revealed problems in Charlotte, not unlike those we’ve witnessed in other parts of the country. But, what happened here doesn’t sit well with longtime Charlotteans who thought we had a tradition of solving problems “the Charlotte Way.” In a special two-hour Public Conversation, we examine what happened, look back on the city’s history and how it may have contributed to this, look forward to where we go from here and hear from you.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Charlotte Talks hosts a public conversation Tuesday night on strengthening trust after the shooting of Keith Scott. A forum is one way to approach this, but there are many one-on-one discussions going on in the community.  Here's one of them.

Jay Price

In wake of the police shooting of Keith Scott a third night of protests went more smoothly as National Guard members helped Charlotte police maintain control.

Tom Bullock

Throughout the morning we heard from WFAE reporters who were on the ground in Charlotte's Uptown last night, city officials, and from the people who protested. We've pieced together our complete coverage from Thursday's broadcast of Morning Edition to make sure you don't miss a story. 

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
Tom Bullock / WFAE

This latest round of protests started peacefully. "It was all cool," said 31-year-old Eddie Thomas, "until riot cops came out. And once the riot cops came out, within five minutes, you had a man on the ground bleeding."

WFAE Reporters Recap Tuesday Night's Protests

Sep 21, 2016
Officer from Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department line up to confront protesters
Adam Rhew / Charlotte Magazine

WFAE reporters Nick de la Canal and Gwendolyn Glenn, and Charlotte magazine associate editor Adam Rhew were all at the protests that erupted last night in the University area after a black man was shot and killed by a black CMPD officer. We recap last night's protests and what we know about the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott. 

Flickr/Suzie T

North Carolina's standing as a venue for championship-level collegiate sports has taken another hit because of House Bill 2. The Atlantic Coast Conference announced today that it will move 10 championship events out of North Carolina this year - including the ACC football championship game that was scheduled for December 3 in Charlotte. 

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