World

Latin America
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Guatemala's First Female Attorney General Takes On Country's Biggest Criminals

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Guatemala has seen its share of misery from the 36-year-long armed conflict that killed more than 200,000 people, to the current wave of drug crime. Well, Guatemala is now one of the most violent countries in the world, but there are also signs of progress. One public official is seeking justice for crimes of the present and the past with impressive results.

NPR's Carrie Kahn has this profile of Guatemala's first female attorney general.

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Asia
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

U.S. Flies B-2 Stealth Bombers Over South Korea Amid Escalating Tensions With The North

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Technology
5:33 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Cyberattack Against Spam-Fighting Organization One Of The Largest Ever

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Police in Europe are investigating a large-scale cyberattack. Some are even calling it the largest of its kind. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, the attack's target is an organization called Spamhaus, but the effects have spilled out into the broader Internet.

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Latin America
3:59 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

From The Stone Age To The Digital Age In One Big Leap

Chief Almir of Brazil's Surui tribe attends a press conference with Google representatives in Rio de Janeiro last year. Chief Almir has brought technology to his previously isolated people, who now use smartphones to send photos of illegal logging in the Amazon.
Vanderlei Almeida AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 6:38 pm

In the heart of the Amazon in western Brazil, an Indian tribe called the Surui lived in the Stone Age as recently as the late 1960s. They wore loincloths, hunted monkeys with bows and arrows, and knew little of the increasingly modernized country in which they lived.

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Africa
3:27 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

In Congo, Lure Of Quick Cash Turns Farmers Into Miners

Gold miners pass up pans of sediment from an open-cast mine near the town of Mongbwalu, in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, last April.
Jonny Hogg Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 5:27 pm

One day while he was watching TV, farmer Emmanuel Tshiteta saw a news segment about people digging.

With shovels and picks, they forged deep holes, then packed the rocks they uncovered into plastic mesh bags. They carried the bags to a river to wash away the dirt, revealing handfuls of aqua-colored ore. The next day, they sold the ore for quick cash.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Students Killed As Mortar Slams Into Syrian University

A photo released by the official Syrian Arab News Agency shows bloody tables and chairs in a Damascus University cafeteria that was struck by a mortar Thursday.
AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:55 pm

A mortar shell hit part of Damascus University in Syria's capital on Thursday, killing at least 10 students and wounding a number of others, according to the official Syrian news agency, which says the shell fell on an outdoor café in the architecture department.

NPR's Susannah George is following the attack from neighboring Lebanon: "State TV footage shows puddles of blood in a colorful school cafeteria, and an awning is torn above where the mortar allegedly landed."

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Thu March 28, 2013

UPDATED: N. Korea Responds To U.S. Bomber Training Run Over Korean Peninsula

A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber flies near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, on Thursday.
Shin Young-keun AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 8:00 pm

The U.S. military is making no secret about a training flight by a pair of nuclear-capable B-2 stealth bombers from a base in the American Midwest to the Korean Peninsula — what's being described as an "extended deterrence mission."

The flight of the two radar-evading bombers "demonstrates the United States' ability to conduct long range, precision strikes quickly and at will," the United States Forces Korea said in a press release Thursday.

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Asia
5:51 am
Thu March 28, 2013

On India's Trains, Seeking Safety In The Women's Compartment

Passengers travel in a train car reserved for woman in Mumbai on March 8. The cars are offered in New Delhi and other places as well. Women say they like the security that the cars offer, but say men's attitudes need to change.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 8:26 pm

Headlines in India's national newspapers tell the story of the state of women in the country. A sampling of what readers in New Delhi encounter makes for sober reading:

"Woman Alleges Gang Rape In Lawyer's Chamber."

"More Shame: Five Rapes In Two Days."

"Woman Resists Molestation, Shot Dead."

India's media have been zealous about exposing the pervasive sexual violence in the country since the gruesome gang rape and subsequent death of a 23-year-old woman in December ignited an international outcry.

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The Two-Way
6:08 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

BRICS Nations To Set Up Development Bank

BRICS leaders, from left, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Chinese President Xi Jinping, South African President Jacob Zuma, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for a group picture during the BRICS 2013 Summit in Durban, South Africa, on Wednesday.
Sabelo Mngoma AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 12:53 pm

The leaders of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – emerging economies that collectively are referred to as BRICS – announced Wednesday the creation of a development bank to fund infrastructure projects in developing nations.

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Europe
4:30 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Long After Its Fall, Berlin Wall Is Focus Of New Protests

American actor David Hasselhoff speaks to protesters next to a remnant of the Berlin Wall last week. Thousands of people turned out to oppose a plan to knock down one of the few remaining sections of the wall. A small part was removed Wednesday.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:55 pm

Protected by scores of German police officers, workers removed sections of a key remnant of the Berlin Wall before dawn Wednesday despite earlier protests demanding the concrete artifact of the Cold War be preserved.

The removal came as a shock to residents, just as it did on Aug. 13, 1961, when communists first built the barrier that divided Berlin during the Cold War.

Tour guide Rolf Strobel, 52, was among the scores of people who came to gape at the holes in what had been the longest remaining stretch of the wall — about eight-tenths of a mile.

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