World

The Salt
4:35 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

France Battles Scourge Of Ready-To-Eat Meals In Restaurants

We're guessing microwavable, premade meals are not an issue in this kitchen, at the three-Michelin-star restaurant L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges near Lyon, France.
Laurent Cipriani AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:47 pm

France's vaunted culinary culture has been taking it on the chin lately.

First came the news, which we told you about in April, that the majority of France's restaurants are now fast-food joints.

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Parallels
3:43 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pakistan: 'Collective Failure' Allowed Bin Laden To Hide

This undated image from video, seized from the walled compound of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and released by the U.S. Department of Defense on May 7, 2011, shows bin Laden watching President Obama on television.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:22 am

The "collective failure" of Pakistan's military and spy authorities allowed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden to live in multiple places in the country for nearly a decade. That's the finding of a confidential Pakistani government report published Monday by Al Jazeera.

The 336-page report said officials in the Pakistani government, military, intelligence and security agencies did not know that bin Laden lived in the country.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Parallels
1:59 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:36 pm

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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Parallels
12:15 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Britons Bask In A Summer Of Good News

Britain's Andy Murray celebrates after defeating Novak Djokovic of Serbia at Wimbledon on Sunday in London. Murray was the first British man to win Wimbledon in 77 years.
Mike Hewitt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:10 pm

All news is bad news. Or so the saying goes. Many Brits firmly believe this — and use it as a branch to beat their journalists, one of the more despised species in these isles.

It is, of course, untrue. There's no better example of the media's appetite for good news than the tsunami of euphoria with which they've greeted Andy Murray's Wimbledon triumph on Sunday.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Mon July 8, 2013

'Devastated' Quebec Town Waits For Word About Missing

Comforting each other: A group of young women in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, on Sunday. People there are waiting to hear the fate of 40 people still missing after Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:53 pm

With 40 people still missing after massive explosions Saturday in the center of their town, the people of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, begin the week "with fears that the death toll from a weekend rail disaster could surge," CBC News writes.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Killed By Shots Fired At Pro-Morsi Gathering In Cairo

A wounded man is helped from the scene Monday in Cairo after shots were fired during a protest against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohammed Saber EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:44 am

(This post was last updated at 5:45 p.m. ET.)

An already dangerous, volatile situation turned even deadlier early Monday in Cairo when dozens of people were killed at a protest outside the Republican Guard facility where it's believed ousted President Mohammed Morsi is being held. Most of those who died are reported to have been among a large group of Morsi's supporters.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET. Date Set For Egypt's Election

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Middle East
5:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Dozens Die In Clashes Outside Cairo's Republican Guard HQ

In Egypt, dozens of people were killed in a clash between protesters and security forces Monday morning. The Muslim Brotherhood says government forces fired on them. The military says the headquarters was stormed by protesters.

World
5:01 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Death Toll Expected To Go Higher In Canadian Train Disaster

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:47 am

At least five people have been killed in Canada, after a train carrying crude oil derailed in eastern Quebec on Saturday. Police say dozens of people have been reported missing. For more on the story, David Greene talks to Stephen Puddicombe, of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Russian Lawmaker: Venezuela May Be Last Chance For Snowden

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 4:57 pm

A prominent member of Russia's parliament is adding to pressure on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to leave Russia.

AS NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, Alexei Pushkov, the head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's parliament, said on Twitter that Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden, adding that this might be the 30-year-old computer analyst's last chance to receive asylum.

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