World

The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Zoo In China Swaps Dog For Lion, Hopes No One Notices

Close enough? A Tibetan mastiff, like this one, was placed in the African lion exhibit at a zoo in China's central Henan province.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 3:07 pm

Visitors to a zoo in China got a rude surprise when the lion started barking.

Turns out it was no lion, but just a Tibetan mastiff, a large, hairy breed of dog — which, for what it's worth, more closely resembles the king of the jungle than does perhaps any other domestic canine.

Apparently, officials in Louhe city zoo in central Henan province hoped no one would notice when they decided to make the switch and send the enclosure's regular resident, an African lion, away to a breeding center.

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Parallels
2:29 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt's Bloody Crackdown Raises Specter Of Prolonged Battle

An Egyptian army soldier stands Thursday amid the charred remains of the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, in the center of the largest protest camp of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, that was cleared by security forces in Cairo on Wednesday.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:32 pm

In the wake of the deadly crackdown by Egypt's security forces, many analysts are no longer talking about a country struggling with democracy. Rather, they see a revolution gone awry and a military that seems determined to crush the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Parallels
1:05 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Syrian Village Surrounded By Civil War

Rebels hold the central Syrian region of Al Houleh, but the area is surrounded by government troops. Supplies have to be smuggled in, like these fruits and vegetables that are being transported across Houleh Lake.
Rasha Elass

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:35 am

Before Syria's civil war, Al Houleh was a small, quiet farming region to the north of Homs. But a massacre last year, blamed on government loyalists, left several dozen villagers dead.

Since then, the Al Houleh region has become rebel-held territory, and government troops are choking it. Trapped in the siege are several hundred civilians, all of them related to the rebels.

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World
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Is Democracy Finished In Egypt?

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We start today in Egypt. Hundreds of people are dead. Thousands more are injured there. That's after the military staged an assault on the camps of protesters, targeting specifically the supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The military now has the country on lockdown and has declared a state of emergency, but members of the Muslim Brotherhood vow to continue protesting until Morsi is reinstated.

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Books
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine.
Clara Molden Camera Press Redux

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:15 pm

Part of our summer reading series Island Reads, highlighting authors from the Caribbean

Andrea Stuart was curious about her family's history in Barbados. And through years of careful research, she found that her bloodline includes both slave owners and slaves. She has written about her own family, as well as a detailed history of slavery in the Caribbean, in her book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu August 15, 2013

After Deaths Of Hundreds, More Bloodshed Feared In Egypt

Posters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi lay amid the rubble of a protest camp in Cairo after Wednesday's crackdown by government forces.
Ahmed Assadi EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:30 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

"It's difficult to see a path out of this crisis, at least not without more people dying."

That's how NPR's Cairo bureau chief, Leila Fadel, ended her Morning Edition report Thursday. After Wednesday's deadly crackdown by Egyptian troops on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi — a crackdown that according to latest estimates left more than 500 people dead and 3,500 or so wounded — the fear is that there will be much more bloodshed.

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Middle East
5:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt Is Under A State Of Emergency

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:24 am

It was perhaps the bloodiest day in Egypt since the uprising in 2011. Security forces on Wednesday launched a major operation to clear supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi from two sit-in camps in Cairo but the violence quickly spread to other parts of the city.

Middle East
5:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Remains Defiant After Crackdown

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:30 am

Hundreds of people were killed in Egypt Wednesday when armed forces cleared protest camps set up by backers of ousted President Morsi. David Greene talks to Steven Cook, senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, about the situation in Egypt.

Middle East
5:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Violent Crackdown Spread Beyond Cairo

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:26 am

The deadly confrontations in Egypt on Wednesday were not limited to Cairo. To find out what happened in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, David Greene talks to Mohammed Abushaqra, a civil society advocate.

Africa
5:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Government Spokesman: There Wasn't A Peaceful Solution

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Badr Abdel Atty(ph) is the spokesman for Egypt's foreign ministry. He joins us from Cairo now. Welcome to the program.

BADR ABDEL ATTY: Hello, sir.

SIEGEL: And the foreign ministry issued an official statement today regarding the deaths of Egyptians both in Cairo and also around the country. What is that statement? What does the Egyptian government have to say?

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