World

The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Mugabe Declared Winner In Zimbabwe's Presidential Poll

Zimbabwe's longtime President Robert Mugabe has been declared the winner in elections that give him another five-year term. He's shown here at a July 30 news conference.
Tsvanigirayi Mukwazhi AP

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 3:06 pm

Zimbabwe's longtime President Robert Mugabe has been declared the winner in elections that give him another five-year term. But the opposition says the vote was rigged.

Mugabe won by 61 percent, with his main challenger, Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, trailing far behind in the official results from the July 31 vote. Mugabe's party, the Zimbabwe African National Union, also managed a comfortable win in parliamentary elections.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Interpol Issues Alert Following Al-Qaida-Linked Prison Breaks

Libyans gather near a burned-out vehicle after an attack outside the courthouse in Benghazi on July 28, the day after more than 1,000 inmates escaped during a prison riot.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 3:32 pm

A series of high-profile prison breaks linked to al-Qaida in Iraq, Libya and Pakistan has prompted Interpol to issue a global security alert asking member countries to "swiftly process any information linked to these events."

The Lyon, France-based international police agency noted that because al-Qaida was suspected to be involved in the jailbreaks, it was urgent to determine whether the organization was directly linked and to capture the escapees.

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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Pentagon Papers Leaker Daniel Ellsberg Praises Snowden, Manning

Daniel Ellsberg was a military analyst in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret study of U.S. government decision-making in Vietnam.
Paul J. RIchards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 4:49 pm

Daniel Ellsberg, the military analyst who in 1971 leaked the top-secret Pentagon Papers detailing the history of U.S. policy in Vietnam, tells NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday that unlike Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, he "did it the wrong way" by trying first to go through proper channels — a delay that he says cost thousands of lives.

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The Two-Way
8:03 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Suicide Bombers Attack Indian Consulate In Afghanistan

Security officials investigate the scene of an attack near the Indian consulate in the city of Jalalabad, Afghanistan, on Saturday.
Babrak Associated Press

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 3:26 pm

A botched attack on an Indian consulate in Afghanistan's eastern city of Jalalabad has left nine civilians dead in addition to the three suicide bombers, security officials say.

NPR's Sean Carberry reports from Kabul that the Taliban has disclaimed responsibility for the bombing in which two-dozen people were also wounded.

Sean says the explosion occurred outside the consulate but that most of the victims were at a neighboring mosque. Two other attackers died in a gun battle with security forces.

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Iraq
7:45 am
Sat August 3, 2013

The Bob Dylan Of Iran

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Four years ago, Iranian singer Mohsen Namjoo was touring in Italy when he learned when he learned he would not be able to go home. The Iranian Revolutionary Court had ruled that one of Namjoo's songs disparaged the Quran. He would have to serve five years in prison if he set foot back in Iran. But the music that concerned the court was somewhat unusual for Namjoo; most of his music actually steers clear of religion and politics.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

MOHSEN NAMJOO: (Singing in foreign language)

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Middle East
7:45 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Talks In Mideast May Hinge On Two-State Solution

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 8:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Africa
7:45 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Zimbabwe Election Ruled Fair By African Union

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. We begin in Zimbabwe, where President Robert Mugabe and his party are predicting a landslide victory in the election held earlier this week. But the opposition is crying voter fraud and threatening protests. From the capital, Harare, NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

CROWD: (Foreign language spoken)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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Parallels
4:44 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Bhutan's New Prime Minister Says Happiness Isn't Everything

Tshering Tobgay receives appointment as prime minister in the Bhutanese capital, Thimpu, last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 8:28 am

Sad but true, Bhutan's Gross National Happiness index is not immune to politics.

Much has been made in recent years of the measure preferred by the tiny Buddhist kingdom over such cold and utilitarian Western-style metrics as gross domestic product.

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World
5:19 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

U.S. State Department Cautiously On Alert

U.S. embassies and consulates throughout the Muslim world will be closed on Sunday and possible for longer. The State Department says it is taking the step "out of an abundance of caution" and wouldn't say if they are receiving direct threats. Members of Congress say there are concerns about an al-Qaida-linked attack. Last year, the U.S. ambassador to Libya was killed in Benghazi, along with three other Americans. At that time, there were also violent protests at U.S. embassies in Cairo and Tunisia.

Around the Nation
5:19 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Gay Bars Join Russia Protests By Boycotting Stoli

Gay bars from West Hollywood to London are condemning Russia's anti-gay laws by shunning one of its most iconic exports: vodka. The foremost brand affected by the boycott is Stolichnaya, or Stoli. The company says it's being wrongfully targeted.

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