World

The Two-Way
6:44 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Bloodbath' In Cairo As Troops Move On Morsi Supporters

Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful.
Hesham Mostafa EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition' just after 10 a.m. ET: NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 5:08 p.m. ET.)

In what looks to be the bloodiest day since the July 3 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, dozens of people in Cairo were killed Wednesday as government forces moved to clear Morsi's supporters from sites where they have been camped.

By evening, the ministry of health reported 275 people had been killed and 2,001 had been injured across the country. The government said 43 policemen had been killed.

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Middle East
5:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Security Forces Move In On Egyptian Protests

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

After days of tense standoff in Cairo, Egyptian security forces began clearing two sit-in camps by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police, warned in a statement that the forces would deal firmly with protesters acting "irresponsibly."

Asia
5:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rescuers In India Try To Reach Sailors Trapped In Submarine

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, rescuers are trying to reach 18 sailors feared trapped in a submarine that caught fire after a massive explosion in Mumbai last night. The defense ministry said at least some of those on board have been killed. This smoldering sub is in its berth at a highly secured naval base, with only a portion visible above the surface.

This incident comes as a setback for India, just as the country is trying to beef up its military. And for more, we're joined by NPR's Julie McCarthy from New Delhi. Julie, good morning.

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Middle East
5:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

After 5 Years, Mideast Peace Talks To Resume

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
3:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilians Flood To U.S. On Massive Shopping Sprees

Camila DeSouza, a 17-year-old Brazilian, shops for shoes at a mall in Sunrise, Fla., on July 16, 2012. During their winter, Brazilians flock to the U.S., mainly to shop. Even with the cost of airfare figured in, many products are far cheaper in the U.S. than in Brazil.
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald/MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:26 pm

What's the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world? If you guessed in Mexico or China, you'd be wrong.

It's actually in Brazil, Sao Paulo to be exact. The consulate there is giving a record number of visas to Brazilians who want to visit the U.S. And that is giving a boost to the economies of cities like Miami.

On a recent day, Tiago Dalcien and his girlfriend stand outside the U.S. Consulate in Sao Paulo clutching their passports and other documents. He is a 30-year-old banker; his girlfriend is a doctor.

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The Salt
6:16 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

In Iraq, Laying Claim To The Kebab

Many different Middle Eastern cultures claim to have invented the kebab.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:54 pm

When you hear the word "kebab" in America, you might think of skewers with chunks of chicken or beef and vegetables, marinated and grilled on coals or gas. But say "kebab" in the Middle East, and it means a lot of things — chunks of lamb or liver on skewers, or the more popular version of grilled ground meat logs found in Turkey, Iran and much of the Arab world.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Canada Revokes License Of Company In Quebec Rail Disaster

The railway company whose train derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, last month can no longer operate in Canada. An image shows the scene one week after the disaster.
Ian Willms Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:54 pm

The railway whose crude oil-carrying train derailed and exploded in the center of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, last month can no longer operate in Canada, the country's Transportation Agency says. The disaster resulted in more than 40 deaths and the destruction of many of the town's central buildings.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Row Over The Rock: Britain And Spain Feud Over Gibraltar

A dispute over fishing rights at Gibraltar has grown into an international spat between Britain and Spain. Here, cars sit in line at the border crossing between Spain and Gibraltar earlier this month.
Marcos Moreno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:21 pm

Tensions over fishing rights and border checks are driving officials in Spain and Britain to consider legal options in their newly escalated dispute over the status of Gibraltar.

In recent weeks, Spain has insisted on performing comprehensive border checks that slow traffic to Gibraltar, a rocky outcropping of land at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, in a move seen as an answer to Gibraltar's creation of a concrete reef in disputed waters.

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The Salt
10:49 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Urban Beekeeping Can Be Bad For Bees

Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:27 pm

Two British scientists are dumping cold water on campaigns to promote urban beekeeping. They say that trying to "help the bees" by setting out more hives is naive and misguided if the bees can't find enough flowers nearby to feed on. You'll just end up with sick and starving bees.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Beware The Pacu, Experts Tell Men Who Skinny-Dip In Scandinavia

This pacu, a fish native to Brazil, was caught in the Øresund Sound, a body of water that separates Sweden and Denmark.
Henrik Carl Natural History Musem of Denmark

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 12:09 pm

The appearance of a Brazilian fish has sent a chill through summertime swimmers in Sweden and Denmark. The alarming fish isn't the much-feared piranha but its cousin, the pacu, which has large teeth and a reputation for attacking men's testicles.

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