World

The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

1 In 8 Suffers From Chronic Hunger Globally, U.N. Report Says

Schoolgirls eat a free midday meal in Hyderabad, India, last month. India has offered such meals since the 1960s to persuade impoverished parents to send their children to school. A U.N. report released Tuesday finds modest progress in the worldwide fight against chronic hunger.
Mahesh Kumar A. AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:17 pm

Worldwide, roughly 1 in 8 people suffered from chronic hunger from 2011 to 2013, according to a new report from three U.N. food agencies.

They concluded that 842 million people didn't get enough food to lead healthy lives in that period, a slight drop from the 868 million in the previous report.

The modest change was attributed to several factors, from economic growth in developing countries to investments in agriculture. And in some countries, people have benefited from money sent home by migrant workers. But the gains were unevenly distributed, the report's authors say.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Snowden Is A Finalist For European Human Rights Award

Edward Snowden, seen here in a photo provided by The Guardian, is a finalist for the Sakharov Prize. Earlier this year, Snowden leaked classified information about secret U.S. surveillance programs.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:29 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contract worker who leaked documents detailing America's secret and broad surveillance activities, is on the short list of nominees for Europe's Sakharov Prize, which recognizes those who fight for human rights.

Other finalists include Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl who survived being shot in the head; and three political prisoners in Belarus.

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Parallels
10:11 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Fearing Detention, Many Young Syrian Men Stay In The Shadows

Young men ride a horse cart in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo last year. Many young Syrian men stay indoors and off the street because they are afraid they may be detained as suspected rebels or rebel sympathizers.
Phillipe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:50 am

The author is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

The young men of Syria account for many of those fighting on both sides of the country's civil war. Yet those on the sidelines of the conflict are facing heavy burdens of their own.

All over Syria, many young men, particularly those from rebellious towns, spend their days holed up at home to avoid running into trouble with the Syrian authorities.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Chemical Weapons Disarmament Team Arrives In Syria

A U.N. convoy crosses the Lebanon-Syria border Tuesday, as a chemical weapons disarmament team crosses into Syria to begin the task of inventorying the country's arsenal of banned weapons.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 10:53 am

A team of chemical weapons experts has arrived in Syria, where they will begin the long and complicated task of destroying the country's chemical weapons arsenal. Under a plan endorsed by the U.N. Security Council, the weapons are to be destroyed by next June.

Syria is wracked by a civil war that has killed more than 100,000 people and forced more than 2 million others to flee the country, according to recent U.N. figures.

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Middle East
4:31 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Netanyahu Urges World To Keep Pressure On Iran

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 9:04 am

A day after a meeting with President Obama, Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu takes center stage at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday. He will likely dwell on Iran's suspect nuclear program and warn the world community against being taken in by Tehran's recent charm offensive.

Parallels
3:34 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Ethical Tradition Meets Economics In An Aging China

A woman surnamed Chu (left), 77, attends the hearing of a case against her daughter and husband in Wuxi, east China's Jiangsu province, on July 1. Chu's daughter has been ordered to visit her at least once every two months, in the first case under a new law to protect the elderly.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:44 am

The sound of Buddhist chants wafts through an annex of the Songtang Hospice, the first private facility of its kind in Beijing. A group of lay Buddhists is trying to ease the passage of a recently departed soul of a patient.

When I first visited this place nearly two decades ago, the average patient stayed just 18 days. Now, it caters to people who are not terminally ill, and the average stay is about five years.

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Middle East
4:32 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Turkish PM Pushes Reforms For Religious Minorities, Kurds

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 10:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today in Turkey, the government announced a new package of democratic reforms. The package includes granting some rights long sought by the Kurdish minority. A tenuous peace process between the military and Kurdish militants is hanging in the balance.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul that the proposed reforms would also lift a ban on women wearing headscarves in some state institutions.

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Claim: Leaks About Al-Qaida Do More 'Damage' Than Snowden's

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:10 pm

Leaks in August about plans al-Qaida leaders were supposedly making to attack American interests abroad have "caused more immediate damage to American counterterrorism efforts than the thousands of classified documents disclosed by Edward Snowden," some "government analysts and senior officials" tell The New York Times.

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Digital Life
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Latino Rebels: Getting Stories From The Ground Up

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Law
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Deporting Parents, Good Policy?

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the founder of the blog Latino Rebels joins us to talk about the portrayal of Hispanics in politics and pop culture.

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