World

Parallels
3:34 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Ethical Tradition Meets Economics In An Aging China

A woman surnamed Chu (left), 77, attends the hearing of a case against her daughter and husband in Wuxi, east China's Jiangsu province, on July 1. Chu's daughter has been ordered to visit her at least once every two months, in the first case under a new law to protect the elderly.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:44 am

The sound of Buddhist chants wafts through an annex of the Songtang Hospice, the first private facility of its kind in Beijing. A group of lay Buddhists is trying to ease the passage of a recently departed soul of a patient.

When I first visited this place nearly two decades ago, the average patient stayed just 18 days. Now, it caters to people who are not terminally ill, and the average stay is about five years.

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Middle East
4:32 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Turkish PM Pushes Reforms For Religious Minorities, Kurds

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 10:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today in Turkey, the government announced a new package of democratic reforms. The package includes granting some rights long sought by the Kurdish minority. A tenuous peace process between the military and Kurdish militants is hanging in the balance.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul that the proposed reforms would also lift a ban on women wearing headscarves in some state institutions.

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Claim: Leaks About Al-Qaida Do More 'Damage' Than Snowden's

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 2:10 pm

Leaks in August about plans al-Qaida leaders were supposedly making to attack American interests abroad have "caused more immediate damage to American counterterrorism efforts than the thousands of classified documents disclosed by Edward Snowden," some "government analysts and senior officials" tell The New York Times.

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Digital Life
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Latino Rebels: Getting Stories From The Ground Up

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Law
12:48 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Deporting Parents, Good Policy?

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the founder of the blog Latino Rebels joins us to talk about the portrayal of Hispanics in politics and pop culture.

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Parallels
11:09 am
Mon September 30, 2013

A History Of Love Gone Wrong, All In One Croatian Museum

At the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb, Croatia, each item is accompanied by a story from the donor on how a romance fell apart.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:50 am

I confess I'm not much of a museum tourist. On a recent visit to Croatia's capital, Zagreb, I strolled past three museums without feeling any urge to step inside. Then I came across one I just couldn't ignore: the Museum of Broken Relationships.

"It's a collection of objects donated by people who have broken up," says Drazen Grubisic, a co-owner of the museum. "Each item has an accompanying story."

Some are amusing, others sarcastic and a few are just plain heartbreaking.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Canada To Launch Billion-Dollar Marijuana Free Market This Week

A new free market for medical marijuana in Canada will replace small growers with large-scale indoor farms.
Menahem Kahana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 1:53 pm

Canada is ushering in what it projects to be a $1.3 billion medical marijuana free market this week, as it replaces small and homegrown pot production with quality-controlled marijuana produced by large farms. The market could eventually serve up to 450,000 Canadians, according to government estimates.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Multiple Car Bombs Wreak Havoc In Baghdad, Killing Dozens

Iraqis look at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, where at least 10 car bombs were detonated during the city's rush hour Monday.
Khalid Mohammed AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 1:30 pm

A spate of car bombs exploded during Baghdad's morning rush hour Monday, killing at least 47 people and wounding dozens more. Most of the bombs struck areas with large Shiite populations; various news agencies are reporting that from nine to 14 separate bombs were detonated.

Many of the car bombs resulted in far more injuries than deaths. But at least one explosion was especially deadly. According to the BBC and Reuters, an attack in Baghdad's Sadr City district killed at least seven people.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Popes John Paul II, John XXIII To Become Saints Next April

Pope John Paul II in 1982
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 11:06 am

The Vatican said Monday that it has set April 27, 2014, as the date that popes John Paul II and John XXIII will be "raised to sainthood."

Their canonization will come on "the Second Sunday of Easter and Divine Mercy," the Holy See added.

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Europe
5:59 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Greece Cracks Down On Violent Golden Dawn Party

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 7:44 am

Over the weekend, Greek police arrested around two dozen party leaders, including members of parliament, from the Golden Dawn party — one of Europe's most violent political parties. Charges include murder and blackmail.

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