World

Science
5:04 am
Sun December 29, 2013

Centuries Before China's 'Great Wall,' There Was Another

In Jiaonan county, the Qi wall incorporates outcrops of bedrock.
Linda Nicholas The Field Museum

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 11:12 am

The Great Wall of China, built more than 2,000 years ago, stands as one of the monumental feats of ancient engineering. Stretching thousands of miles, it protected the newly unified country from foreign invaders.

But before the Great Wall, warring Chinese dynasties built many other walls for protection. An American archaeologist recently began surveying one of the biggest.

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The Two-Way
8:38 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

No Al-Qaida Link In Benghazi Attack, 'New York Times' Reports

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 2:56 pm

The New York Times, after a months-long investigation, says the attack on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, "turned up no evidence that Al Qaeda or other international terrorist groups had any role in the assault."

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The Two-Way
6:40 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

Student Killed In Clashes At Egyptian University

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood at Al-Azhar university make the four-finger Rabaa gesture as they hold tear gas canisters during clashes with riot police and residents of the area at the university's campus in Cairo on Saturday.
Reuters /Landov

An Egyptian student is dead Saturday after clashes between police and Muslim Brotherhood supporters at the country's main Islamic university.

Egyptian media reported that the violence erupted when security forces fired tear gas to disperse pro-Brotherhood students who were trying to prevent classmates from getting into buildings at the famed Al-Azhar university. Some of the buildings were set on fire. Police said 101 people were arrested.

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Middle East
5:02 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

Who Will Lead The Middle East Out Of Turmoil?

Originally published on Sat December 28, 2013 6:54 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

To the Middle East now where 2013 has been a dark year. The promise of the Arab Spring has been reality checked by events in Syria, Egypt and across the region.

Marc Lynch is the director of the Institute for Middle East Studies at George Washington University. As the end of the year approached, he sat down and made what he calls a dark list, people in the Middle East who have contributed to the chaos. He says much of the violence stems from a failure of leadership.

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Africa
5:02 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

'Smell Of Death' Lingers In South Sudanese City

Originally published on Sat December 28, 2013 6:54 pm

Transcript

ARUN RAT H, HOST:

From NPR West, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

We're going to begin the program today in South Sudan where despite talk of a possible cease-fire, the fighting continues. A power struggle there between the president and his former vice president spiraled into violence along tribal lines. Hundreds have died and tens of thousands are displaced. If not checked, many fear the conflict will become Africa's next civil war.

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Parallels
3:29 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

What It Costs To Cover Your Noggin In Jerusalem

A salesman at Ferster Quality Hats in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood Mea Shearim suggests rabbit felt hats made in Hungary for around $200. Twice the price of made-in-China, but he says they last much longer.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 8:16 am

Just how far does a dollar go? We'll try to answer that question as part of an occasional series on what things cost around the world. In this installment, NPR's Emily Harris looks at the price of headwear in Jerusalem.

In Israel and the Palestinian territories, headgear is big business. How much does it cost to cover up for different religions, traditions and fashions?

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The Two-Way
3:14 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

Rebel Leader Skeptical Of South Sudan Cease-Fire Offer

Tens of thousands of refugees are flocking to United Nations compounds like this one in Juba, while fears fester that fighting in the capital will resume.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

A senior official in South Sudan said Saturday that government troops will attack the main rebel stronghold if rebels turn down a proposed cease-fire.

The government had offered the truce on Friday to end two weeks of ethnic violence that has killed more than a thousand people.

Those rebel forces are loyal to former Vice President Riek Machar, accused by supporters of President Salva Kiir of leading a coup attempt two weekends ago that sparked violence across the country.

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Research News
12:54 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

The Hunt For Meteorites Begins In Antarctica

The most abundant meteorites found in Antarctica are called chondrites. They are some of the oldest objects known in the solar system.
Katherine Joy Antarctic Search for Meteorites Program / Case Western Reserve University

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 10:07 am

Antarctica is one of the best places on Earth to spot these fallen stars.

Each winter — which is summer in down south — a team of geologists camps out on an Antarctic glacier in the middle of nowhere, often where no human has ever tread. It's kind of like a space voyage, but a lot cheaper.

And it's the meteorite that's done most of the traveling.

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Arts & Life
8:55 am
Sat December 28, 2013

As The Lead Cools, Some See Their New Year Take Shape

Is that a cross? A ship with a figurehead? What future do you see in these lead shapes? In one New Year's tradition, fortune-seekers drop molten lead into cold water and guess what the shapes portend.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Sat December 28, 2013 4:31 pm

As we approach the threshold of a new year, it's only human to wonder what's ahead. In Germany and a few nearby countries, the answer to this age-old existential question is found in molten lead.

When Gesine Krätzner had some scraps of lead left over from a roofing project last winter, she knew just what to do with them. Krätzner lives in Portland, Ore., but grew up in Germany. As a kid, she would melt bits of lead with her family for a New Year's Eve tradition called Bleigiessen.

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Parallels
5:00 am
Sat December 28, 2013

Rushing Toward Chaos: Covering The Aftermath Of Typhoon Haiyan

A boy stands in the ruins of the leveled a neighborhood in Tacloban. Food and water supplies were almost nonexsistent in the days immediately after the storm.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat December 28, 2013 7:00 pm

It felt like a dream.

The Marines kept flying over us all night long. Their hulking C-130 cargo planes rattled the tarp we'd jerry-rigged above our heads. NPR photographer David Gilkey and I were lying in sleeping bags next to the runway of the destroyed Tacloban airport. We'd arrived a few hours earlier in the back of one of those military aircraft. Now we were just waiting for daybreak.

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