World

Parallels
1:54 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

The Fences Where Spain And Africa Meet

African migrants climb the fence that separates Morocco from the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa in February. Those who make it into Ceuta have reached Spanish — and European Union — soil. Their fate often depends on the country they came from. Some are deported, while others can apply for political asylum or for the status of economic migrant.
Reduan EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

On a rocky beach in North Africa, a chain-link fence juts out into the Mediterranean Sea.

This is one of Africa's two land borders with Europe, at two Spanish cities on the African continent. Ceuta and Melilla are Spanish soil — and thus part of the European Union — separated from the rest of Europe by the Mediterranean, and separated from the rest of Africa by huge fences.

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Goats and Soda
11:17 am
Thu April 16, 2015

'To My Brave Sisters': Malala Speaks To Missing Nigerian Girls

At her home in the U.K., Malala Yousafzai reads her letter to the missing Nigerian schoolgirls.
Courtesy of Malala Fund

"One day your tragic ordeal will end, you will be reunited with your families and friends, and you will have the chance to finish the education you courageously sought," Malala Yousafzai said Monday to the girls in Nigeria who have been missing for a year.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Thu April 16, 2015

South Korean President Promises To Raise Sewol Ferry, One Year After Tragedy

People pay tribute at a group memorial altar for victims of the sunken South Korean ferry Sewol at a remembrance hall in Ansan on Thursday.
Jung Yeon-Je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:21 am

Speaking on the first anniversary of a catastrophe that killed 304 people, President Park Geun-hye pledged Thursday to salvage the Sewol ferry, which capsized and sank during a trip to a resort island. Nine bodies are believed to remain inside the ship.

"Most of the victims were actually students from a single high school," NPR's Elise Hu reports, "so this obviously sent the country into deep grief — but also outrage, since the rescue effort was widely viewed as bungled."

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Ocean Search Area For Lost Malaysian Airliner Is Set To Double

Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss (left), Malaysia's Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai (center) and Chinese Transport Minister Yang Chuantan shake hands after a news conference about Flight MH 370 on Thursday. The search zone for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight will be doubled if nothing is found in the huge undersea area now being scanned for wreckage.
Mohd Rasfan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 9:49 am

It has been more than a year since Malaysia Airlines Flight MH 370 was lost with 239 people on board. Officials now say they'll double the already huge search area in the southern Indian Ocean to 46,000 square miles if the plane isn't found by next month.

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Asia
5:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

South Koreans Mark Ferry Disaster Anniversary

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

South Korea is marking a grim anniversary. It's been a year since a ferry accident that killed more than 300 people.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRAYER CEREMONY)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Singing in foreign language).

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Afghanistan
5:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Kabul Appears To Be More Tense Since U.S. Troop Drawdown

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 12:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Parallels
3:59 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Islanders Pushed Out For U.S. Base Hope For End To 40-Year Exile

Chagossians weep at the grave of their parents on Peros Banos Island April 10, 2006. Fifteen elders are allowed to visit once a year.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 5:11 pm

One of the most important U.S. military bases in the world sits in the middle of the Indian Ocean on an atoll called Diego Garcia. It's the largest of the Chagos Islands, a British territory far from any mainland that is spread out across hundreds of miles. Thousands of people, called Chagossians, used to live on Diego Garcia.

The U.S. military moved in in the 1970s only after the British government forced the entire Chagossian population to leave.

For more than 40 years, the islanders have been fighting to return. Now, it seems they have a growing chance.

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Parallels
3:46 am
Thu April 16, 2015

An American Journalist Explains Why He Had To Flee Iraq

American journalist Ned Parker (foreground) is the Reuters bureau chief in Baghdad. He fled Iraq last week after receiving threats in response to reports on human rights abuses by Shiite militias allied with Iraq's government. He's shown here at Iraq's Foreign Ministry in 2007.
Courtesy of Ned Parker

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:05 pm

When the U.S. withdrew its troops from Iraq in 2011, many American news organizations followed suit, scaling back or shutting down their bureaus. Ned Parker was among a handful of American journalists who continued to report from the country.

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The Salt
5:52 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Street Food No More: Bug Snacks Move To Store Shelves In Thailand

The new line of HiSo edible insects. The fried crickets are on the top row, in order: original flavor, cheese, barbecue, seaweed. The fried silkworm pupae snacks are seen on the bottom row, in the same order of flavors.
Michael Sullivan for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 7:37 pm

C'mon, who doesn't like bugs in a bag? Crunchy little critters that are good and good for you? Panitan Tongsiri is hoping the answer is: no one.

The 29-year-old Thai entrepreneur is trying to change the way Thais eat insects — OK, the way some Thais eat insects — one bag at a time.

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National Security
5:36 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

President Obama To Remove Cuba From State-Sponsored Terrorism List

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:52 pm

President Obama intends to take Cuba off of the list of state sponsors of terrorism, and now Congress has a month and a half to decide if it wants to stop the process. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Roberta Jacobson, assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs, who led the negotiations between the U.S. and Cuba.

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