World

The Two-Way
7:02 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Thai Court Removes Prime Minister Yingluck From Office

Ousted Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra received roses from supporters in a Bangkok suburb on Wednesday.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 10:29 am

Saying Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra had violated Thailand's constitution, the country's Constitutional Court ordered the caretaker leader to step down from office, along with nine ministers. She had held the post since the summer of 2011.

The court's ruling Wednesday stems from accusations that Yingluck abused her powers in 2011 by transferring the national security chief, who had been appointed by the opposition. The court's nine judges went on national television to broadcast their decision.

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Africa
6:37 am
Wed May 7, 2014

South Africans Cast Ballots 20 Years Since Apartheid

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 8:47 am

This election marks 20 years since Nelson Mandela was elected and will be the first since his death. Renee Montagne talks to Verashni Pillay, associate editor for the Mail & Guardian in Johannesburg.

Africa
5:14 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Kidnapped Nigerian School Girl Escapes, Talks About Ordeal

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 8:47 am

Renee Montagne talks to Michelle Faul, the Nigeria bureau chief for The Associated Press, on the latest regarding the abductions of Nigerian schoolgirls by the Boko Haram terror group.

Middle East
5:06 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Syrian Opposition Finds A Voice On Pirate Radio

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 9:09 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Syrian journalist Obadah Al-Kaddri about being named one of Time magazine's top 100 influential people. Al-Kaddri is director of Radio Watan, a pirate station heard in Syria.

Parallels
3:37 am
Wed May 7, 2014

In Ukraine's Corridors Of Power, An Effort To Toss Out The Old

An activist waves the Ukrainian national flag at Independence Square on April 6.
Valentyn Ogirenko Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 10:57 am

The first time I saw the word "lustration," I thought it was a case of bad translation from Ukrainian. In Kiev, a flyer advertised a talk by the head of parliament's "lustration" committee.

"What does this word mean in English?" I asked a press aide.

"I don't know the English word for it, but it will be an interesting speech," he replied.

And indeed, it was.

Weeks later, Sam Greene, director of the Russia Institute at King's College in London, explained to me that lustration actually is an English word.

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World
5:34 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

UN Committee Grills Vatican Officials On Sex Abuse

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 11:05 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

For the second time this year, Vatican officials were subjected to scathing questions by a U.N. panel. The questions focus on the church's handling of cases of sexual abuse by priests. The grilling came in two days of hearings in Geneva by the U.N. Committee on Torture. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli is following this and joins me now. And, Sylvia, earlier this year, it was a U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child that issued a very harsh report about clerical sex abuse. What is the Committee on Torture saying now, and is it different?

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World
5:34 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

In Ukraine, West's New Diplomatic Options May Be Few

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:04 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Secretary of State John Kerry says the U.S. won't sit idly by while Russia fans the flames of instability in Ukraine. But so far, U.S. and European sanctions haven't changed Russia's calculations. Kerry blames Russia for failing to calm the crisis. Russia says Ukraine should stop its offensive against separatists in the east. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports that the diplomatic options during these tense days look limited.

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Africa
5:34 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

With UN Chief In South Sudan, Warring Sides Agree To Talk

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 11:06 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The president of South Sudan and the commander of the rebels there have agreed to sit down and talk. That's one thing that's come out of a visit to the country by U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

As NPR's Gregory Warner reports, the U.N. chief also addressed calls to bring African troops into the troubled peacekeeping process.

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The Two-Way
5:30 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Can Africans Do A Better Job Of Peacekeeping In South Sudan?

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon holds a child at a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan, on Tuesday. There have been increased calls for a contingent of African troops to be involved in peacekeeping operations.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 7:25 pm

The commander of the rebel movement in South Sudan has agreed to talk peace — if he can make it out of his secret war bunker.

Riek Machar told U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon by phone on Tuesday that he would "try his best" to make it to Friday's scheduled sit-down in Ethiopia, but that he was "now in a very remote area."

There might be some truth to it: South Sudan is one of the least developed countries in the world, with almost no paved roads outside of the capital. The current rainy season can make travel virtually impossible.

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Parallels
3:49 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

20 Years After Apartheid, South Africa Asks, 'How Are We Doing?'

The Rev. Desmond Tutu, shown during a press conference last month in Cape Town, has been sharply critical of South Africa's political leadership as the country marks 20 years since the end of apartheid. He said he wouldn't vote for the ruling African National Congress in Wednesday's election.
Jennifer Bruce AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 10:34 am

When South Africa buried apartheid with its first all-race election in 1994, the Rev. Desmond Tutu danced with joy as he cast his ballot.

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