World

World
5:04 am
Mon July 13, 2015

A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 12:48 pm

Paul and Sheena Wain were on their way to the Maldives for vacation — but when they tried to check in for their flight in Manchester, England, the airline turned them down, saying their 14-year-old daughter Grace appeared pale, maybe sick.

In fact, Grace is red-haired and fair-skinned.

"We live in Scotland," her dad said. "That's just the way she is."

Grace was finally allowed to board after the family got a note from her doctor.

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Europe
5:26 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

Talks Continue For Possible Greek Bailout

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Latin America
5:24 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

Manhunt Underway For 'El Chapo,' Who Escaped Maximum Security Prison In Mexico

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
5:10 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

Opening Indonesia's Eyes In 'The Look Of Silence'

In The Look of Silence, Indonesian optician Adi Rukun, pictured here in a scene from the film with his mother, investigates the murder of his older brother in mass violence following a 1965 coup. Perpetrators and their relatives "would taunt us for being their victims," he says.
Courtesy of Drafthouse Films and Participant Media

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 7:25 am

American filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer traveled to Indonesia in 2001 to make a documentary about plantation workers. What he found was the legacy of genocide. The documentary he made, The Act of Killing, looked at life in the country since a 1965 coup led to the slaughter of between 500,000 and 2 million people by paramilitary death squads, in the name of stamping out communism.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

Malala Turns 18, And Opens A School For Syrian Refugee Girls

Malala Yousafzai celebrated her birthday and the opening of a new school with "brave and inspiring girls of Syria" in Lebanon on Sunday.
WAEL HAMZEH EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 4:55 pm

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani education activist and youngest-ever Nobel Peace laureate, celebrated her 18th birthday today by inaugurating a secondary school for Syrian refugee girls in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, near Syria's border.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

How Close Is 'Close'? Iran And The West Inch Toward Nuclear Deal

Secretary of State John Kerry walks on the terrace of Palais Coburg, the venue for nuclear talks in Vienna, on Sunday.
Leohard Foeger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 7:02 pm

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

The Associated Press reports that negotiators are prepared to announce a historic nuclear deal with Iran on Monday, but the U.S. State Department and some Iranian diplomats are tamping down speculation.

The AP says: "The envoys said a provisional agreement may be reached even earlier — by late Sunday. But they cautioned that final details of the pact were still being worked out and a formal agreement must still be reviewed by leaders in the capitals of Iran and the six world powers at the talks."

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Sun July 12, 2015

Djokovic Beats Federer To Hold On To Wimbledon Title

Novak Djokovic celebrates his win over Roger Federer in the men's singles final at Wimbledon.
Dominic Lipinski PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 6:51 pm

Novak Djokovic successfully defended his Wimbledon singles title against a concerted effort by Roger Federer, who was hoping for a record eighth Wimbledon title.

It is Djokovic's ninth Grand Slam title and third Wimbledon singles championship. He becomes only the eighth man to successfully defend that title.

Djokovic won the first set 7-6, and Federer leveled it in the second, 7-6. The third set was suspended for rain with a score of 3-2 for Djokovic. When play resumed, Djokovic closed out the set by winning it 6-4; he won the last set 6-3.

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Parallels
9:36 am
Sun July 12, 2015

In El Salvador, Gang Killings Take An Agonizing Toll

Suspected members of El Salvador's 18th Street gang stand handcuffed in pairs at a police station in Panchimalco, near San Salvador. The government has launched well-publicized raids, roundups and a crackdown on gang leaders, locking them away in maximum security prisons.
Manu Brabo AP

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 10:13 am

What if more than 600 people were murdered in Arizona or Tennessee in one month — 22 dead every day?

That's the problem facing the tiny Central American nation of El Salvador, which has the same population as each of those states. Last month, the death toll in El Salvador hit 677, nearly twice as many murders as at the same time last year. Politicians, police and experts differ on what do to.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Sun July 12, 2015

Europe Struggles To Pull Together New Greek Bailout Plan

Finnish Finance Minister Alexander Stubb (right) speaks with Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos during a round table meeting of eurogroup finance ministers in Brussels on Sunday.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 10:33 am

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

European creditors were still trying to forge a new deal with Athens to ward off a collapse of the Greek economy — the third bailout since 2010.

But European Union President Donald Tusk cancelled a meeting of 28 leaders, something NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson says is "a very rare occurrence which ... highlights how far the sides are still apart but also suggests there won't be a Grexit worked out, at least not today."

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Parallels
8:58 am
Sun July 12, 2015

Seeking Control Over Narrative, Egypt Puts Growing Pressure On Journalists

Al-Jazeera English journalists Mohammed Fahmy, left, Baher Mohamed, center, and Peter Greste, right, appeared in a cage during their trial on terrorism-related charges in Cairo in March 2014. The journalists denied all charges. Greste, an Australian, was released earlier this year, but Fahmy, a Canadian-Egyptian, and Mohamed are still on trial.
Heba Elkholy AP

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 9:38 am

On Saturday, a blast ripped through Cairo's Italian consulate, rocking the capital. And one of the first things Egyptian police did was briefly hold four foreign journalists — because they arrived too quickly.

It's not a surprise in the current atmosphere, where the foreign media is basically being painted as an enemy of the state in local press and in official statements.

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