World

Parallels
3:42 am
Fri April 17, 2015

Turkish Educator Pledges $10M To Set Up Universities For Syrian Refugees

Syrian children listen to a teacher during a lesson in a temporary classroom in Suruc refugee camp on March 25 in Suruc, Turkey. The camp is the largest of its kind in Turkey with a population of about 35,000 Syrians who have fled the ongoing civil war in their country.
Carl Court Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 2:23 pm

Once a sleepy border town, Reyhanli, Turkey, is now bursting with Syrian refugees, many of them school-age. More than half a million Syrian refugee children are out of school, and the education crisis is fueling an epidemic of early marriage, child labor and bleak futures.

"I just finished the 12th grade and I don't know what to do," says Abdullah Mustapha, a refugee from the Syrian town of Hama.

In fluent English, he talks about his dreams of a college education, but he doesn't speak Turkish well enough to pass the language test required for state universities.

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Parallels
5:51 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Iraq's Leader Finds Friends In Washington, But Faces Battles At Home

Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, speaking Thursday in Washington, said recent battlefield victories showed the Islamic State could be defeated. The extremist group still holds large parts of the west and the north of Iraq.
Kevin Wolf Kevin Wolf

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

When Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi weighs the pros and cons of running such a fractured country, here's the upside: He can count on five separate military groups supporting his battle against the self-declared Islamic State.

The downside is that he has limited control of these groups, and of much of his country.

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Africa
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Thousands Flee After Anti-Immigrant Violence Strikes South Africa

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with South African journalist S'thembile Cele about how violence against immigrants has flared in South Africa. At least five people have been killed, and more than two thousand have fled to makeshift camps and police stations.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Economy
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

New Asian Development Bank Seen As Sign Of China's Growing Influence

Chinese Finance Minister Lou Jiwei (left) speaks during the signing ceremony of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, Oct. 24, in Beijing.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:54 am

China says 57 countries have signed on as charter members of the new China-backed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. They include some of the United States' closest allies, which added their names despite pressure from the White House not to join.

The Obama administration is concerned the new bank will compete with Western-led institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, but leaders of those institutions don't seem to be worried.

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World
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Muslim Migrants Threw Christians Overboard, Italian Police Say

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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World
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Diego Garcia Islanders Displaced In U.K. Failure Hope To Return Home

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

Natives of Diego Garcia were displaced over 40 years ago when the U.S. built a military base on the Indian Ocean island nation. After years of fighting to return home, the islanders are are more hopeful than ever that they will soon get their wish.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Parallels
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

They Speak Hebrew And Keep Kosher: The Left-Behind Ethiopian Jews

Jewish worshippers gather at a makeshift synagogue established by the Jewish Agency for Israel for Ethiopian Jews in Gondar, Ethiopia, in 2012.
Jenny Vaughan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

In the half darkness of an adobe hut in Gondar, Ethiopia, 20-year-old Gezahegn ("Gezi") Derebe pulls out an acoustic guitar. As on many evenings when the power goes out, he entertains his family by singing. Though his mother, Ayelesh, sways to the tune, she doesn't understand the lyrics, because Gezi sings not in his native Amharic, but in Hebrew.

Behind him, on a wall kept cool with a traditional mixture of cow dung and ash, hangs a laminated map of Israel. Above it are the framed photographs of his relatives who have already managed to emigrate there.

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Technology
4:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Experts Divided Over Iran's Cyberactivity Since Start Of Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:40 pm

The U.S. government and cybersecurity companies agree that Iran has greatly improved its cyberattack capability over the past two years. A report being released tomorrow says Iran's cyberattacks have increased during nuclear talks, but some experts question that conclusion.

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The Salt
2:31 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

In the Fortune Garden kitchen in El Centro, Calif., near the Mexican border, cooks speak to each other in Cantonese, and waiters give orders in Spanish.
Courtesy of Vickie Ly/KQED

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 4:20 pm

If you ask people in the city of Mexicali, Mexico, about their most notable regional cuisine, they won't say street tacos or mole. They'll say Chinese food. There are as many as 200 Chinese restaurants in the city.

North of the border, in California's rural Imperial County, the population is mostly Latino, but Chinese restaurants are packed. There are dishes in this region you won't find anywhere else, and the history behind them goes back more than 130 years.

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The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

In Posthumous Riposte, Editor Of 'Charlie Hebdo' Targets 'Islamophobia'

Stephane "Charb" Charbonnier, editor of Charlie Hebdo, is seen on Sept.19, 2012. The late editor takes on politicians, the media and "Islamophobia" in a posthumously published book completed two days before he was killed Jan. 7.
Michel Euler AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 4:36 pm

Stephane Charbonnier, the editor of Charlie Hebdo who was killed in the Jan. 7 attack by two radical Islamists on the satirical magazine, is having the last word.

In a new book completed just two days before the attack that killed 12 people, Charbonnier, who was commonly known as "Charb," says the fight against Islamophobia protects Islam more than it does Muslims. The title of the 88-page book, published Thursday, translates to Letters to the Swindlers of Islamophobia who play into the Hands of Racists.

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