World

Parallels
3:45 am
Wed May 14, 2014

China Puts Brass On Trial In Fight Against Military Corruption

Chinese sailors stand guard on China's first aircraft carrier as it travels toward a military base in Hainan province. China has been waging a public crackdown on military corruption, perhaps the largest such campaign in more than six decades of communist rule.
China Stringer Network Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:04 am

China's ongoing crackdown on military corruption may be the toughest — or at least best publicized — in more than six decades of communist rule. Some top brass are on trial, and teams of inspectors have fanned in search of graft.

But all of that may seem like a distant light at the end of a long tunnel for former navy captain Tan Linshu. Tan and his wife have lived in a tiny, subterranean room for two years as they search for justice in a case that suggests what the crackdown is up against.

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The Two-Way
8:46 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Oscar-Winning Director Malik Bendjelloul Dies At 36

An Aug. 20, 2012 photo of documentary filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul. Police in Sweden say the director behind the Oscar-awarded music documentary Searching for Sugar Man, died on Tuesday.
Anders Wiklund AP

Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul, who won an Oscar last year for his 2012 documentary Searching for Sugar Man, has been found dead in Stockholm at age 36, police and family members confirm.

Reuters reports:

"Stockholm police declined to provide any further details about Bendjelloul's death."

"'What I can say is that there are no suspicions any crime was involved,' Stockholm police duty officer Pia Glenvik said.

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The Two-Way
8:00 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Obama Sanctions Individuals In Central African Republic

A former Seleka soldier stands in the ruins of a mosque, which residents say was attacked and burned by anti-Balaka militiamen, about 16 miles from Bambari.
Siegfried Modola Reuters/Landov

President Obama has issued an executive order authorizing sanctions against five people in the Central African Republican in connection with the country's sectarian conflict.

In a statement, the White House cited "[escalating] violence and human rights abuses," and noted that "[communities] that have lived together peacefully for generations are being torn apart along sectarian lines."

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Planet Money
5:04 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

In Somalia, Collecting People For Profit

Adad Hassan Jimali stands next to a sign for her private camp for displaced persons. The camp, which is in Mogadishu, Somalia, is called Nasiib Camp.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 6:28 am

Last year I took a drive through the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia, in a bulletproof SUV. My seatmate was Justin Brady, who at the time was working for the U.N. We were both wearing body armor — standard issue for these trips — and we were followed by a second car with more guys with guns.

Coordinating humanitarian aid can be an incredibly risky job in Somalia, where Islamist militants al-Shabab have declared open season on any Westerner or anyone accused of working with the so-called Western occupier.

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Shots - Health News
4:38 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Gene Sequencing Could One Day Make Malaria Easier To Treat

A health official takes a blood sample from a child's finger for a malaria test at a clinic in Bong Ti Lang village on the Thai-Myanmar border.
Narong Sangnak EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:30 pm

Malaria has proved one of the hardest diseases on the planet to treat. The World Health Organization estimates there are nearly 200 million cases each year, and the parasitic infection is blamed for some 700,000 deaths annually.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Russia Aborts Rocket Engine Sales, GPS Cooperation With U.S.

Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Antares rocket lifts off at Wallops Island, Va., in April of last year. The Antares uses a pair of Russian-made NK-33 rocket engines that Moscow says it will stop supplying for military launches.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 4:18 pm

In a tit-for-tat sanctions dispute over the situation in Ukraine, a top Russian official said Tuesday that Moscow would stop supplying the U.S. with rocket engines used in military satellite launches and suspend operation of GPS ground stations in Russian territory.

The moves come after Washington banned some high-tech equipment sales to Russia as part of sanctions in response to the annexation of Crimea.

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Middle East
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Frustrations Defeat Another Diplomat, As U.N. Syria Envoy Quits

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The conflict in Syria now in its 4th year, and a diplomatic solution seems as far off as ever. The international diplomat who's been trying to lead negotiations announced he's stepping down. It's a new sign of just how bad things are Syria. And as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, there doesn't seem to be a plan B.

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Law
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

EU Court Tells Google That People Have 'The Right To Be Forgotten'

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Europe's highest court has issued a landmark decision against Google, ruling that people can go directly to Google and request that the search engine delete certain results about them. For more information, Audie Cornish turns to Meg Ambrose, a professor of communication, culture, and technology at Georgetown University.

Middle East
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

In Return To Old City, Syrian Civilians Find Homs In Devastation

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Salt
4:05 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports

Cattle rancher Sharon Harvat says she's worried about how the Brazilian beef imports will impact her business.
Luke Runyon NPR

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 8:25 pm

Sharon Harvat drives a blue pickup truck through a field of several hundred pregnant heifers on her property outside Scottsbluff in western Nebraska. Harvat and her husband run their cattle in the Nebraska panhandle during the winter, then back to northern Colorado after the calves are born.

Harvat says when she heard about a proposal to open up the beef trade with Brazil, she felt a pit in her stomach.

"On an operation like ours, where we travel a lot with our cattle, that would probably come to an abrupt halt if there was an outbreak," she says.

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