Jun 10, 2014
Alison Leiniger

I live with a chef.

This revelation is met with a template reaction. There’s usually a slightly uplifted chin, a sudden opening of the eyes, and a broadening of the smile. I wait to see which response I’ll get:

“Oh, so you must eat really well!”

Amy Rogers

It’s like winning an Oscar for your first film, and food writer Adrian Miller has done it: He won a James Beard award for his first book, Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time. 

In Good Taste: How to Be a Gracious Guest

May 27, 2014
Google Cultural Institute

Welcome back to “In Good Taste,” where we explore all things mannerly pertaining to food and how to enjoy it with others. Today we’ll explain how to be the perfect dinner party guest.

John Stephen Dwyer / Wikimedia

Food is a telling thing. For a true venture into cultural anthropology, visit a local grocery store – preferably a mom-and-pop operation. I’ve shopped for groceries on three continents and in many states of the US. I always find interesting things to take home.

Welcome to “In Good Taste,” where we’ll explore all things mannerly pertaining to food and how to enjoy it with others. Today we’ll explain how a host can make dinner party guests feel welcomed.

Steven Depolo / Flickr

For my second attempt at preparing a meal that wasn’t constructed in a New Jersey chemical plant and wrapped in microwave-safe plastic, I opted for America’s Test Kitchen’s Thin-Crust Whole-Wheat Pizza with Garlic Oil, Three Cheeses, and Basil. While pizza might seem a bit ambitious for a no-talent chef, if I could master this, think of the money I’d save by not having to tip the delivery guy every night. 

How To Make A Perfect Mint Julep

Apr 28, 2014
Tammy Green

There are a number of days on the calendar when the average American drinker decides to forgo his usual celebratory beverage routine of “open bottle, pour contents,” and dabble instead in the art of what is known, in current parlance, as mixology. With one of these days quickly approaching I would like to help you prepare by explaining the subtleties of the Mint Julep.

Maria Roselina

Apr 17, 2014
Paolo Piscolla

There is a moment Sunday,
an inexplicable instant of clarity
and purpose the dying often summon,
when my mother extends a hand through the mist,
lifts off her bed and makes for the kitchen.

On a marble slab, she mixes egg and flour,
salt and water, rolls flat the shroud of dough,
snips it into tagliatelle,
and covers it with a sheet.

Even the rain halts and the sun appears
to allow her passage into the garden
for Romas, parsley,
garlic and basilico.


Apr 14, 2014

So many times I've witnessed this
that familiarity is not the word

to conjure my mother's taking up of the breast-
shaped purple blackness, her paring

knife commencing from the areola,
strokes of peel stripping away into the sink

until the corpuscular fruit is nude
and ready to be sliced. In the colander

she tiers the rounds, salting each layer
to draw out the bitter water, and weights

them down with a piece of heart-
shaped iron with which her tailor father pressed.

They sit on the counter all day:
the eggplant with the heart pressing on them,

the water in the pan beneath
turning red.

Tamra Wilson

Experts tell us that hot dogs are full of preservatives. I know this for a fact.

When I was ten years old, my mother had a portable dishwasher she seldom used. She preferred hand-washing to dragging the heavy machine across the linoleum and hooking the clumsy nozzle to the hot-water faucet. So the portable stayed next to the refrigerator – and this is where our saga begins.