WFAEats

How To Make A Perfect Mint Julep

Apr 28, 2014
Tammy Green

There are a number of days on the calendar when the average American drinker decides to forgo his usual celebratory beverage routine of “open bottle, pour contents,” and dabble instead in the art of what is known, in current parlance, as mixology. With one of these days quickly approaching I would like to help you prepare by explaining the subtleties of the Mint Julep.

Maria Roselina

Apr 17, 2014
Paolo Piscolla

There is a moment Sunday,
an inexplicable instant of clarity
and purpose the dying often summon,
when my mother extends a hand through the mist,
lifts off her bed and makes for the kitchen.

On a marble slab, she mixes egg and flour,
salt and water, rolls flat the shroud of dough,
snips it into tagliatelle,
and covers it with a sheet.

Even the rain halts and the sun appears
to allow her passage into the garden
for Romas, parsley,
garlic and basilico.

Eggplant

Apr 14, 2014
USDA.gov

So many times I've witnessed this
that familiarity is not the word

to conjure my mother's taking up of the breast-
shaped purple blackness, her paring

knife commencing from the areola,
strokes of peel stripping away into the sink

until the corpuscular fruit is nude
and ready to be sliced. In the colander

she tiers the rounds, salting each layer
to draw out the bitter water, and weights

them down with a piece of heart-
shaped iron with which her tailor father pressed.

They sit on the counter all day:
the eggplant with the heart pressing on them,

the water in the pan beneath
turning red.

Tamra Wilson

Experts tell us that hot dogs are full of preservatives. I know this for a fact.

When I was ten years old, my mother had a portable dishwasher she seldom used. She preferred hand-washing to dragging the heavy machine across the linoleum and hooking the clumsy nozzle to the hot-water faucet. So the portable stayed next to the refrigerator – and this is where our saga begins.

Anne White (https://www.flickr.com/photos/annabanana74/) / Flickr

This is the second installment in an on-going series about a full-grown adult learning to cook for the first time. Read the back story here.

While listening to America’s Test Kitchen recently, I heard a recipe for thin-crust whole-wheat pizza with garlic oil, three cheeses, and basil, which seemed like the perfect recipe to inaugurate my novice cooking project, so yesterday after work, starving and excited about my first attempt to make pizza, I printed out the recipe and walked up to my neighborhood grocery.  

That’s where things started to go wrong.

Navja Sol

I’m surrounded by foodies. My friends, my family—they go out for long, elaborate meals where they order things like pork belly and wild mushroom sorbet, close their eyes to taste it, sigh with contentment, and then turn to offer me a bite, which I invariably refuse. For me, dining out is merely a way to avoid cooking and eating is merely a way to avoid starving. It’s as much a chore as doing laundry or cleaning my bathroom but worse because if I procrastinate for too long I’ll die. 

Random House

It’s hard to keep up with Ruth Reichl. In 29 minutes by phone, the acclaimed food writer covered a lot of ground, answering my questions about what she cooks for her family, what she loves to eat in other people’s homes, the one food she despises – and her forthcoming novel, Delicious.

Stihler Craig / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Let’s talk about the Ohio River, shall we?

The waterway that drains the eastern half of the Midwest and has divided North from South for more than two centuries, is more than a state boundary. It’s demarcation for Southern cuisine.

Let me explain. I grew up in Shelby County, Illinois, a full hundred miles north of the Ohio. It was an existence devoid of cathead biscuits, home-made cornbread, and stone-ground grits. Okra, country ham, and collards did not exist.

Charlotte Jewish Film Festival

Fay Tenenbaum knows what you want: cake.

No one can count how many she’s baked in her 90 years, and she has no intention of slowing down anytime soon.

Now, a short film about her, titled "The Cake Lady," is coming to Charlotte. It’s part of the tenth annual Charlotte Jewish Film Festival, an ambitious and enjoyable series that presents dramas, comedies, and documentaries that illuminate the Jewish experience in the U.S. and around the world.

Amazon.com

Looking for a tasteful way to celebrate Black History Month? Look no further than the shelves of your favorite bookstore.

But with more that 1.3 million search results online, how do you find a place to start? That’s easy: Ask an expert.

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