WFAEats

Tim Wharton bristles at being called a "foodie," with its connotation of lush, sumptuous "food porn." He prefers "gastronaut," a label popularized by late British television chef Keith Floyd, for its evocation of intrepid culinary exploration.

decorated eggs
Carol Sawyer

Ham or lamb? Deviled eggs or dyed eggs? Cook at home or go to a restaurant? When it comes to celebrating Easter, the culinary questions are somewhat different than those for other occasions.

It’s a serious holiday but it wears a public face full of some pretty silly food. (Also pretty, silly food.) Just look at the cookbooks and magazines: They’re covered in rainbows of candy and bunnies and other cute things. If you didn’t know better, you might overlook the fact that Easter is the most important Christian holy day. 

I'm getting ready to explain who I am when Joan Nathan answers the phone.

“Amy?”

She already knows my name, which shouldn’t surprise me – since she seems to know just about everything.

A 24 'Carrot' Recipe: Meoli-Stanton Family Carrot-Cauliflower Soup

Mar 27, 2017
a pot of Meoli-Stanton family carrot-cauliflower soup
Jennifer Stanton

This is a “silver lining” recipe that came out of a terrible experience. I started experimenting with carrots 24 years ago when an oncology nurse explained that the chemo my husband was receiving was actually toxic doses of Vitamin A. She compared it to consuming at least a five-pound bag of carrots a day.

If you do this, your face will hurt, you’ll grind down your molars into mule chompers, your skin will turn orange, and you will hate carrots by Day 5.

Of course, he didn’t grasp at the time that toxic doses of Vitamin A were only one part of the deadly cocktail. He just hung on the nurse’s words in the hope he could naturally help himself.

A Surprising Season: Once More With Orzo

Mar 17, 2017
Orzo with wild rice
Caroline Hadilaksono / Flickr/creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Lately the weather has been see-sawing between winter and summer, then back to winter. Just as we’re ready to ease into longer days and lighter fare, here comes another arctic blast that makes us want to cup our hands around a bowl of something steaming.

It’s the perfect time for orzo, that short, little pasta that’s shaped like long grains of rice. It’s truly adaptable, pairing well with most anything from artichokes to zucchini.

To Share Or Not To Share

Mar 10, 2017
Chinese meal
David Woo / Flickr/creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who happily share their food, and those who’d rather stab your outstretched hand with a carving fork.

Both are completely understandable. On one hand, sampling each other’s meals can be a fun way to taste things you’d might not otherwise try. On the other likely-to-be-impaled hand, why should you have to split your birthday slice of cheesecake six ways?

Potatoes For Jayne

Mar 6, 2017
French fried potatoes in a skillet
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

In happy times we celebrate with food, and in hard times we console each other with it. A few years back, my good friend Jayne lost her mother. I cooked her a dish I later named “Sympathy Salmon,” and wrote about it here on WFAEats.

tasting food samples
RIC's Market Foundation

Even as a child, Angela Gray knew injustice when she saw it. Grocery stores in her Detroit neighborhood were dirty, smelly – and expensive.

“I'm going to open a free store,” she proclaimed.

“You won’t be in business long,” her mother replied.

Movie Night Menus book jacket
Running Press

Looking for a tasteful new way to celebrate the Academy Awards? You’ll find “epic” dinner and drink pairings in a new book that’s jammed full of recipes, photos, and delicious film lore.

Turner Classis Movies: Movie Night Menus: Dinner and Drink Recipes Inspired by the Films We Love is the creation of siblings Tenaya Darlington and André Darlington. While doing research for their previous book, The New Cocktail Hour, they were impressed by the lavish cocktail culture of earlier eras.

In Good Taste: Who Pays For The Party?

Feb 13, 2017

Dear Etta Kate: My friend recently celebrated her birthday. Her husband invited ten of us to a dinner at a moderately-priced restaurant. I ordered from the "middle of the menu" as I was taught. When the check came, it sat on the table for fifteen minutes. Finally, the guest next to me picked it up and began figuring his portion. Then others began to do the same! Was I wrong to assume that "hosting" a dinner meant paying for it? It wasn't extravagant, and the host is financially secure (if that even matters).

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