WFAEats

Courtesy Jillian Hishaw

For more than a decade, agricultural attorney Jillian Hishaw has been working in the southeast to alleviate hunger, help financially distressed farmers hold on to their land, and find markets for locally farmed goods. 

Now Hishaw has been named a “Food Changemaker” by the Clif Bar Family Foundation.

pickles
Stacy Spensley / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

People laughed out loud when I told them my New Year’s resolution: “I resolve to eat more pickles.” That was one year ago, at the start of 2017.

Well, no one is laughing now – because pickles are hot. (They’re also cold, quick, sweet, sour, half-sour, kosher, deep fried, and more.)

recipe in cookbook
jspatchwork / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Need a perfect gift that’s guaranteed to fit? One that doesn’t pack on the calories, get stale, or break if you drop it?

Of course you do. But you don’t want to grab just anything from the best seller list. Here at WFAEats we’ve been digging in our seasonal stacks for new and unusual books that will delight anyone with an appetite for food and the stories that make it special. So take a look at this delicious sampler we’ve selected.

Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Brunswick stew, sweet potato cakes, blackberry cobbler, and maple popcorn are just a few of the dishes that members of the Catawba Indian Nation are busy preparing for visitors who will attend the 4th Annual Craft and Food Fair on Saturday, Nov. 18.                  

“People of the community bake and prepare dishes,” explains Tonya Rice, the Children’s Services Director for the community. She’s also a chef in her own right, and estimates it takes about 50 people to produce the event.

mecklenburg.ces.ncsu.edu

If you’ve ever wanted to learn pickling, pressure canning, or preserving, now’s your chance to help design the workshops that appeal to you.

Amy Rogers

First things first: Fill your plate with seafood stew, spicy slaw, catfish, corn, and bread. Then make your way to your assigned seat to begin the Black Lunch Table discussion. This interactive experience is designed to explore attitudes and create dialogue that addresses the ways in which race relations function in our communities.

In Good Taste: 'Hogging' The Conversation

Oct 10, 2017

Dear Etta Kate: I'm a member of a roving supper club that meets at different members' houses. One of the members is an awful bore. She monopolizes every conversation with endlessly tedious stories on trivial topics. No one ever interrupts her, because this is the polite South. Several people have dropped out of the group. I probably shouldn't say anything when I'm a guest at someone else's table. But is there anything I can do as a hostess when it happens at my house? Perhaps it will encourage others to do the same? Please help!

Signed, Garrulous in Garner

flower shape made from hard-boiled egg
Tamra Wilson

It’s not every day I see articles combining food and genealogy. A piece on the FamilySearch blog caught my eye: “How to Start Family Food Traditions from Scratch.” The essence of the article was to encourage readers to preserve their family food traditions—or maybe even start some.

Food traditions are those recipes, meals and cooking habits we acquire being part of a family. Like any other part of family history, they should be written and passed down.

The Lemonade Stand Cookbook
From The Lemonade Stand Cookbook: Step-by-Step Recipes and Crafts for Kids to Make--and Sell!, by Kathy Strahs (Burnt Cheese Press, 2017). Reprinted with permission.

Kathy Strahs was watching her 7- and 9-year-old children operate a lemonade stand when she realized something pretty complex was going on. “It was more than just kids selling lemonade. They were collaborating, strategizing, preparing drinks and food, shouting to attract customers,” the California author said.

And from that idea, a book was born: The Lemonade Stand Cookbook: Step-by-Step Recipes and Crafts for Kids to Make and Sell. It’s a fun, full-color guide to everything from setting up and decorating a stand to pricing and promoting items to be sold.

Harvest Baker Tomato Slab Pie
Excerpted from The Harvest Baker © by Ken Haedrich, photo © Johnny Autry, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

Has an avalanche of tomatoes, squash, berries, or beets landed in your kitchen?

Never fear, Ken Haedrich is here to help. He has a new book, The Harvest Baker: 150 Sweet and Savory Recipes Celebrating the Fresh-Picked Flavors of Fruits, Herbs and Vegetables. Even better, he’ll be visiting Charlotte on August 22 and will help you solve your persistent pie problems. 

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