Voting Rights Act

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A federal trial starts in Winston-Salem on Monday morning that will have big implications for voting rights in North Carolina and, potentially, across the country. The U.S. Justice Department and several groups are suing North Carolina over the sweeping election overhaul it passed two years ago. Federal appeals court judges have already indicated that some of the changes likely violate the Voting Rights Act.

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Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative maps, it is still unclear whether those maps violate the Voting Rights Act. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday ordered the North Carolina Supreme Court to reconsider the maps. WFAE's Michael Tomsic and Ben Bradford discuss what this means.

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Federal appeals court judges ruled Wednesday the U.S. Justice Department is likely to succeed in its argument that North Carolina's election overhaul will deny or curtail African-Americans' right to vote. The appeals court ordered North Carolina to put some changes on hold this November. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joins us now to explain why.

A federal appeals court will give the North Carolina NAACP and other groups one last chance to argue that North Carolina's election overhaul should be put on hold this November. On Tuesday, the court granted an expedited appeal of a federal judge's decision that denied an injunction against some of the changes.

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 A federal judge ruled late Friday against the U.S. Justice Department's request to put some of North Carolina's sweeping election changes on hold. Judge Thomas Schroeder's decision comes about a month after a four-day hearing in Winston-Salem, in which the Justice Department, the NAACP and other plaintiffs said the changes will deny or curtail African-Americans' right to vote. 

The federal government is suing North Carolina over its sweeping new voting law. The Justice Department announced Monday it'll challenge at least four parts of the law that it says will restrict minorities' right to vote.

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to strike down part of the Voting Rights Act Tuesday could have a big impact on North Carolina.

North Carolina’s 12th Congressional District has a storied and controversial history and the likelihood is that the district will garner even more attention when a variety of events converge within the next few months. 

With Congressman Mel Watt’s nomination to head the Federal Housing Financing Agency, an open-seat contest has already attracted considerable attention, especially from black Democratic candidates seeking to replace the 20-year veteran legislator.