Voter ID


The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected North Carolina's request to reinstate its voting overhaul this November.

It's not a final ruling in the case. But for this election, it means North Carolina can't use a variety of Republican changes a federal appeals court found were passed with discriminatory intent.

Early voting begins Thursday. In light of several lawsuits over North Carolina’s election policies, here's a breakdown of what’s currently in effect.

After hearing exhaustive arguments over the past year and a half, a federal judge in Winston-Salem is set to rule on North Carolina’s sweeping election overhaul. Two summers ago, the U.S. Justice Department and others suing North Carolina tried to convince judge Thomas Schroeder to put the changes on hold. This past summer, judge Schroeder presided over a three-week trial on whether some changes should be thrown out entirely. And over the past week or so, he heard the final phase of the lawsuits: the challenge to voter ID. 

Denise Cross Photography

North Carolina voters will need to take a photo ID along with them to the polls next year.  That ID must by law reasonably resemble the person. The State Board of Election has drafted rules to lay out what that means and is holding public hearings on them across the state, including one in Charlotte Monday night. 

Sun. Headlines: Comments Sought On Voter ID Rules

May 3, 2015

New rules to implement North Carolina’s 2013 Voter ID law are now up for public comment. The draft regulations from the State Board of Elections were released Friday, and will determine how precinct officials decide whether someone has the required photo identification to vote in person starting in 2016.  

Nine public hearings are planned across the state, beginning with a June 3 meeting in Raleigh. There’s a hearing June 8 from 5-7pm at the Hal Marshall auditorium in Charlotte and another in Boone on June 10. Written comments are due by June 30.  

NPR Presents: Voting Rights Or Wrongs?

Oct 30, 2014
Jennifer Lang

North Carolina's new voting law has been a hot topic of discussion—and litigation—this election year. 

The law reduced the number of early voting days, eliminated same-day registration during early voting, and did away with the counting of out-of-precinct ballots. In 2016, voter ID is scheduled to take effect. 

This week, the law was the subject of a public forum hosted by NPR's Michel Martin. We'll now hear some voices from that event. You'll hear from the four panelists first. 

The North Carolina state fair is known for its ferris wheels, fried food and racing pigs. Now a group called Grass Roots North Carolina wants it to add concealed handguns, too.  A judge on Monday will hold a hearing on the gun-rights group’s argument that a recent change in state law makes it illegal for the fair to ban concealed-carry permit holders from bringing guns.

Charlotte Moral Monday Focuses On Voting

Aug 20, 2013
Tasnim Shamma

The state's chapter of the NAACP has been leading weekly protests in Raleigh called Moral Monday.

It's a movement led by clergy members that's now on a state-wide tour and made its latest stop in Charlotte Monday night.

N.C. Files More Suits Over Coal-Ash Runoff

Aug 18, 2013

The state of North Carolina has filed more lawsuits against Duke Energy seeking to force the utility to clean up water pollution from coal ash at 12 power plants. The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources filed two lawsuits Friday in Wake and Mecklenburg counties. Those suits expand the state's litigation to all 14 of North Carolina's coal-fired plants.  Water tests at the 12 sites covered in the new suits showed chemical levels above what’s considered safe. State inspectors also have seen seeping liquid that’s not allowed under Duke’s permits.

Governor McCrory Signs Voter Photo ID Bill Into Law

Aug 12, 2013
Courtesy of the Governor's Office

Governor Pat McCrory signed the sweeping Voter Photo ID bill into law Monday. Starting in 2016, most state residents will be required to bring a photo ID with them to the polls. It also makes other changes to the voting process – including getting rid of automatic straight-party voting.