U.S. National Whitewater Center

A worker at the U.S. National Whitewater Center releases chlorine into the basin below the rafting channel in July.
Mecklenburg County

Last month the family of Lauren Seitz filed suit against the Whitewater Center and the company that designed part of it for wrongful death. The 18-year-old woman from Ohio died last year after coming into contact with a so called “brain-eating amoeba” while rafting at the center.

Only 1 Arrest At Uptown Fourth Of July Celebration

Jul 5, 2017
Crystal Hogue / WFAE

About 20,000 people attended last night’s Fourth of July celebration in Uptown Charlotte last night. CMPD only made one arrest. That even surprised Major Gerald Smith.

“I’m shocked, but I am very pleased. I am very pleased to stand up here and say that there was just one arrest. With that many people in the Uptown area at one time, that is amazing,” he said.

Father Sues Whitewater Center Over Daughter's Death From Brain-Eating Amoeba

Jun 19, 2017

The father of a teenager who contracted brain-eating amoeba after rafting at the U.S. National Whitewater Center filed a lawsuit against the facility Monday on the one-year anniversary of her death.

The suit, filed in Ohio where Lauren Seitz lived, alleges the park’s popular rafting channels were dangerous and that park operators showed “conscious disregard for the safety of visitors.”

North Carolina Senate Republicans are moving ahead with the confirmation process of Governor Roy Cooper's Cabinet members, even as a three-judge panel weighs the legality of doing so.

The U.S. National Whitewater Center will not reopen its river rapids Saturday as was scheduled. Mecklenburg County officials say the delay is of the center's own making. The center needs a permit from the county, but the center only sent in its application for the permit last Thursday, Feb. 23. The county is still reviewing the application.

A worker at the U.S. National Whitewater Center releases chlorine into the basin below the rafting channel in July.
Mecklenburg County

Mecklenburg County commissioners Tuesday night unanimously approved water-quality regulations for the U.S. National Whitewater Center. That follows an Ohio teenager's death this summer from a rare brain infection she contracted after rafting at the center. 

Michael Tomsic

Mecklenburg County health officials say the new chlorine system at the U.S. National Whitewater Center is working like it's supposed to so far. The center installed the new system to address a microorganism linked to a young woman's death after she rafted there in June.

Michael Tomsic

The U.S. National Whitewater Center plans to reopen its rafting channel this week. It’s been closed for more than a month, after a young woman died of an extremely rare brain infection after rafting there. County health leaders say the center has a new treatment system to address the microorganism that likely caused the woman’s death.

Water flowed out of the whitewater center basin and into a nearby wetland.
Mecklenburg County

Contractors over the weekend finished treating and discharging water at the U.S. National Whitewater Center. The center's rafting channel closed after an Ohio woman died after being exposed to what's being called a "brain-eating ameba."

A worker at the U.S. National Whitewater Center releases chlorine into the basin below the rafting channel in July.
Mecklenburg County

Updated 5:29 p.m.
Workers began pumping chlorine into water below the rafting channel at the U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte Wednesday, to remove an organism linked to a woman's death. Under a plan health officials approved this week, the treated water will be discharged into the Catawba River.

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