U.S. National Whitewater Center

A worker at the U.S. National Whitewater Center releases chlorine into the basin below the rafting channel in July.
Mecklenburg County

Mecklenburg County commissioners Tuesday night unanimously approved water-quality regulations for the U.S. National Whitewater Center. That follows an Ohio teenager's death this summer from a rare brain infection she contracted after rafting at the center. 

Michael Tomsic

Mecklenburg County health officials say the new chlorine system at the U.S. National Whitewater Center is working like it's supposed to so far. The center installed the new system to address a microorganism linked to a young woman's death after she rafted there in June.

Michael Tomsic

The U.S. National Whitewater Center plans to reopen its rafting channel this week. It’s been closed for more than a month, after a young woman died of an extremely rare brain infection after rafting there. County health leaders say the center has a new treatment system to address the microorganism that likely caused the woman’s death.

Water flowed out of the whitewater center basin and into a nearby wetland.
Mecklenburg County

Contractors over the weekend finished treating and discharging water at the U.S. National Whitewater Center. The center's rafting channel closed after an Ohio woman died after being exposed to what's being called a "brain-eating ameba."

A worker at the U.S. National Whitewater Center releases chlorine into the basin below the rafting channel in July.
Mecklenburg County

Updated 5:29 p.m.
Workers began pumping chlorine into water below the rafting channel at the U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte Wednesday, to remove an organism linked to a woman's death. Under a plan health officials approved this week, the treated water will be discharged into the Catawba River.

Michael Tomsic

It's been a strange and tragic summer at the U.S. National Whitewater Center. In mid-June, a young woman died from an extremely rare brain infection after rafting at the Charlotte facility. Within a week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the presence of the type of microorganism that likely caused the infection. Since then, the whitewater channel has been closed, regulatory questions have been raised, and fear and misinformation have spread.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made three big points Thursday about a microorganism at the U.S. National Whitewater Center that's likely linked to a woman's death. Two of the points weren't surprising, and the third suggests how the Whitewater Center can reduce the organism's presence.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Governor Pat McCrory is calling for a total review of the U.S. National Whitewater Center's oversight after preliminary tests found a microorganism that may be linked to a woman's death. McCrory made the comments to the Charlotte Observer on Monday. But Mecklenburg County's health director doesn't know if better regulation would help in this case.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have detected the presence of a microorganism at the U.S. National Whitewater Center that may be linked to a woman's death. The Whitewater Center is closing its whitewater channel after the preliminary tests, which found evidence of what's best known as the brain-eating ameba.

Michael Tomsic

Epidemiologists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are testing for a microscopic organism at the U.S. National Whitewater Center. That's after a young woman died recently from a rare infection caused by that organism.

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