Transgender

There won't be a legal resolution to the debate on transgender students and school bathrooms anytime soon. The U.S. Supreme Court handed the case involving a transgender teen in Virginia back to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals Monday.

For nearly a year North Carolina has been front and center in the debate about which bathrooms transgender people can use, thanks in large part to House Bill 2.

Now, with the Trump administration's new guidance on transgender student bathroom use, there are a lot of questions about what this means for our state.

The state Medical Examiner's Office late Monday released the autopsy of Keith Lamont Scott. It shows Scott died of gunshot wounds to the back and abdomen, but lacking in whether Scott was under the influence of marijuana at the time of the shooting. 

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over which bathroom transgender students must use in schools. The nation's highest court took a case out of Virginia.

This case could settle a question about half the states nationwide are suing the federal government over: which bathroom must transgender students use?

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

CMS's new rules on how teachers should handle transgender students has angered some community members. A group organized by the NC Values Coalition spoke at Tuesday night's school board meeting and protested before it. 

Mark Hames / Charlotte Observer

CMS had been coming up with guidance to give schools on how to handle transgender students. That work started before House Bill 2 surfaced requiring students to use the bathroom of the gender on their birth certificate, before the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled otherwise, and the federal government issued its own guidelines. CMS is now holding off on its work, at least for now. 

North Carolina public schools have received two sets of instructions regarding transgender students. The state's House Bill 2 says those students must use the bathroom of the gender on their birth certificate. But recent guidance from the federal government says schools must allow transgender students to use the bathroom of the gender with which they identify.

What is the NC Department of Public Instruction telling school districts to do? "The problem is - what guidance would we give them?" says NC Schools Superintendent June Atkinson. She believes the courts will ultimately rule that students should be allowed to use the restroom that corresponds to their gender identity.  WFAE's Mark Rumsey reports.


Federal officials issued a directive to school districts nationwide Friday saying they must treat transgender students according to the gender they identify with.  That brought another round of criticism from North Carolina officials, including Gov. Pat McCrory, who said federal agencies don't have the authority to decide school policies for bathrooms, locker rooms and other facilities.

twbuckner / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

North Carolina receives nearly $4 billion in federal funds to support the state's public schools and university system. That's money the state could lose because the U.S. justice department deems House Bill 2 discriminates on the basis of sex by not allowing transgender people to use the bathroom of the sex with which they identify. "Could" is the operative word though.

Berger
North Carolina General Assembly

 State Senate Leader Phil Berger says he doesn’t envision any changes to House Bill 2 during the short session that begins Monday, including one revision requested by Gov. Pat McCrory. He also said he’ll push for a 2 percent state budget increase, including another round of teacher raises. 

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