Technology

There is a wave of new design coming and visionaries say it promises to be one of the most important technological advances of our time. 3D, or additive printing, holds possibilities that sound like science fiction, like printing new artificial limbs, human tissue, and medical tools. One company is designing a 3D printer that could someday print an entire house. But there are skeptics who say that 3D printing is expensive and their uses are still more fiction than fact. We'll look at this astonishing new technology with a Charlottean who happens to be an expert, when Charlotte Talks. Originally aired 6/27/13.

CMPD Offers More User-Friendly Crime Monitoring

Aug 15, 2013
CrimeMapping.com

Earlier this week, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department launched a new crime-mapping system. It's much easier to use, updated more frequently and you can even pull it up on your smartphone.  


As technology becomes fully integrated in classrooms, students aren’t the only ones learning. Teachers must operate computers, a variety of applications and other electronic devices while also catering their lesson plans to these technologies. A growing number of schools provide students with laptops or tablet computers and some Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools are even encouraging students to bring devices to school through a Bring Your Own Technology initiative. A 2010 analysis by the U.S. Department of Education concluded that students whose higher educations' blend online and face-to-face interactions outperform others, but how does this apply to grade school students? What are parents and students saying? We’ll discuss the costs, the risks, and the increasingly digital world of learning when Charlotte Talks.

Gaston College

Like the rest of the state, Gaston County is facing a shortage of people with the skills required to work in 

today's high tech factories. Gaston College hopes to address the issue with a training center for students and local residents. This week, the college received a one-and-a half million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce.


UTC Aerospace Systems Celebrates New Charlotte HQ

Jul 1, 2013
Tasnim Shamma

One of the largest aerospace systems providers in the world opened its headquarters in West Charlotte Friday. UTC Aerospace Systems designs and manufactures products like propellers and engines and was founded last year after several mergers and acquisitions. Executives say it expects to add about 50 more jobs in the next five years.

There is a wave of new design coming and visionaries say it promises to be one of the most important technological advances of our time. 3D, or additive printing, holds possibilities that sound like science fiction, like printing new artificial limbs, human tissue, and medical tools. One company is designing a 3D printer that could someday print an entire house. But there are skeptics who say that 3D printing is expensive and their uses are still more fiction than fact. We'll look at this astonishing new technology with a Charlottean who happens to be an expert, when Charlotte Talks.

Lisa Miller

Mooresville’s public schools are used to visitors coming to learn how they blend technology with classes.  That’s because they’ve had a lot of success doing that.  But yesterday they got the ultimate visitor.  President Barack Obama used Mooresville Middle as a backdrop for his plan to provide all public schools across the country with high-speed internet.  

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

CMS Superintendent Heath Morrison has put a price tag on his vision for the district.  He wants Mecklenburg County and the state to pitch in an extra $27 million next year to help fund new programs and expand others.  Those include bringing more technology to classrooms and creating career and technical specialties at schools.  The plan also calls for 10 new positions to help schools coordinate with companies and groups wanting to help. 

WFAE’s Lisa Miller was at last night’s meeting and joins Morning Edition host Duncan McFadyen in the studio. 

Start-Ups Struggle To Find Local Investment

Mar 13, 2013
Viddlz.com

When it comes to start-up technology businesses, let’s just say Charlotte is no Silicon Valley. The local start-up scene has made some recent strides, though. Packard Place in Uptown has emerged as a hub for technology entrepreneurs and last year launched RevTech Labs, a program offering space and support for early-stage companies. The first group graduated five months ago, but they’ve struggled to attract local investors—a common complaint of Charlotte start-ups.

Reducing the rate of high school dropouts and empowering students to succeed is a goal of several organizations in the Charlotte area, including the Arts & Science Council. They're launching a new program that seeks to serve at-risk students called Studio 345. The program is based on another initiative that's been in operation in Pittsburgh since the 70's. It uses the arts, education and the surrounding community to help students achieve. We'll meet Bill Strickland, founder of the National Center for Arts and Technology, and find out how the implementation of a program like his will help kids in the Charlotte region, when Charlotte Talks.

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