Technology & Digital Life

The Salt
6:13 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

White House: We Have A Beef With GMO Regulations

About 90 percent of America's soybeans are genetically modified.

The U.S. government's system for regulating the products of biotechnology, including GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, was born in 1986, and it has been controversial from the start. Now, it will be getting a makeover — in part to assure the public that GMOs really are adequately regulated.

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Goats and Soda
2:33 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

How Salt + Car Battery = Clean Water

A woman in Yatta, Kenya, explains how to make clean water using a car battery and just the right mixture of salt and water.
Jane Mauser Courtesy of MSR

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 7:27 pm

It's easy to take clean, safe water for granted. It just flows out of taps continuously — even in drought-ridden California.

But for hundreds of millions of people around the world, clean water is a luxury. In many places, even patients in hospitals and kids at school don't have water that's safe to drink.

Now, an unlikely partnership of an outdoor equipment manufacturer and a global health NGO is trying to change that.

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The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

Somebody Is Cutting Internet Cables In California

The FBI is investigating a string of recent physical attacks on Internet cables in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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5:55 am
Wed July 1, 2015

USA's 'Mr. Robot,' HBO's 'Ballers' Among Picks For Best Summer TV Series

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson (right) stars opposite Rob Corddry in the HBO series Ballers.
Jeff Daly HBO

Originally published on Tue July 7, 2015 3:29 pm

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All Tech Considered
3:31 pm
Tue June 30, 2015

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

This is a calculated flood map for the city of St. Louis. Water depth goes from deep (dark blue) to shallow (white, light blue). Floodwater can come from the Illinois, Upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers, as well as from heavy local precipitation.
Courtesy of Dag Lohmann/Katrisk

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 12:42 am

A small company in California is hoping to make a big splash by providing detailed flood maps to homeowners and insurance companies. And to do that, the company is using one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.

The company is called Katrisk, based in Berkeley, Calif. Hydrologist and computer modeler Dag Lohmann is one of the company's founders. He says the flood maps the Federal Emergency Management Agency already produces will tell you how prone a particular area is to flooding.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Asked To Divide Zero By Zero, Siri Waxes Philosophical (And Personal)

Siri's answer to the brain-teaser question "What's zero divided by zero" generates a response that people find both funny and unnerving.

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 2:36 pm

The Internet is abuzz about the latest Easter egg found in Apple's Siri, as the virtual assistant gives a philosophical — and, to some, a personal — response to the question "What is zero divided by zero?"

Siri's on-screen answer is straightforward. But her more elaborate verbal reply easily surpasses the simple "Does not compute" with which robots in old sci-fi movies used to announce a bout of cognitive dissonance. For one thing, her answer invokes Cookie Monster.

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Wisdom Of The Crowds? Online Effort Seeks To Raise Funds For Greece

A collection of old Greek Drachma and euro notes and coins.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 4:42 pm

Updated at 12:14 p.m. ET

Only 1,599,888,909 euros to go. A crowd-funding effort to raise the 1.6 billion euros (about $1.8 billion) Greece needs to make a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund has so far raised 111,091 euros ($124,569) from 7,275 donors.

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All Tech Considered
6:36 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Apple Bets Big That You'll Start Paying To Stream Music

Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue speaks about Apple Music during the keynote at the annual developers conference.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:30 pm

Spotify, Google Play, Amazon Prime, Rdio, Rhapsody, Pandora — the list of streaming music service goes on and on. On Tuesday, Apple joins that lineup with the launch of its streaming service, Apple Music. Apple will give consumers a three-month trial, and then it will charge $9.99 a month.

But most music lovers still aren't sure why they should pay. Colin Barrett, 31, has tried a few of the streaming services, but he doesn't use them anymore.

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5:41 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

SpaceX Rocket Explosion Raises Questions About Private Space Companies

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 6:35 pm

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Solar-Powered Airplane Begins Long Journey From Japan To Hawaii

Pilot André Borschberg sent this photo of his flight over Japan; he's now over the Pacific Ocean, heading to Hawaii. He's not expected to land until Friday morning, Eastern time.
Solar Impulse

In the longest leg of its planned around-the-world flight, the Solar Impulse took off from Nagoya, Japan, and is now headed to Hawaii. The plane is powered solely by the sun's energy that's stored in batteries; the current trip is expected to last 120 hours — five days and five nights.

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